Cortexutils 1.1.1 is Here

Lo and behold, The Chefs behind TheHive Project have been pretty busy at the code kitchen, continuously improving some of your favorite recipes. After releasing Mellifera 11.3 and Cortex 1.1.3, here comes the turn of Cortexutils, the Python library containing utility classes for Cortex analyzers.

Version 1.1.1 of the library solves an encoding issue, in fact a regression introduced by the previous release. It also corrects a situation where error reports wouldn’t be generated in case the analyzer did not require configuration (we have a handful of such creatures in store).

You can grab the new Cortexutils release through PIP. To update your existing installation, please run the following command:

 sudo pip install cortexutils --upgrade

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

Cortex 1.1.3 Released

Moments ago, we have announced the release of Mellifera 11.3. And since we don’t want to leave you wanting for more update er fun time, you may want to schedule as well a Cortex update shall you need it 😉

Cortex 1.1.3 is now available. This hotfix corrects the deb package  to make it compatible with Ubuntu 16.04 without having to fiddle with OpenJDK. As we did with TheHive, we have repackaged the software to avoid grabbing OpenJDK 9 (which Cortex does not support) and force the installation of version 8. This version also corrects a cryptic error that might be thrown out by Cortex as a result of an improper interpretation of an analyzer failure.

Download & Get Down to Work

To update your current Cortex installation, follow the instructions of the installation guide. Before doing so, you may want to save the job reports that were not executed via TheHive. Cortex 1 has no persistence and restarting the service will wipe out any existing reports.

Please note that you can install Cortex using an RPM or DEB package, deploy it using an Ansible script, use Docker, install it from a binary or build it from sources.

Support

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? No worries, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

Mellifera 11.3 Released

A few days ago, we have been made aware of a bug in the way we pulled new or updated MISP events to inject them within Mellifera’s alerting panel. As a result, some events did not show up as intended. So you might have missed some of the action shared by peers and partners through MISP.

As true Frenchmen who care a lot about cuisine, TheHive Project’s Chefs went back to their code kitchen and figured out a more palatable recipe to make sure you won’t be left under the impression that you were seeing all new or updated MISP events while in fact you didn’t (we don’t want you to go too easy & lazy n’est-ce pas ?). Mellifera 11.3 (TheHive 2.11.3), a hotfix version has been released to that end and should fix the issue. Please note that you must use MISP 2.4.73 or better.

In addition, this new version of your favorite (or soon to be favorite) Security Incident Response Platform can be installed from a deb package on Ubuntu 16.04 without having to fiddle with OpenJDK. We have repackaged the software to avoid grabbing OpenJDK 9 (which TheHive does not support) and force the installation of version 8.

Finally, if an admin creates an empty case template, users can add tasks to it while previously this wasn’t possible.

Download & Get Down to Work

If you have an existing installation of TheHive, please follow the new migration guide.

If you are performing a fresh installation, read the installation guide corresponding to your needs and enjoy. Please note that you can install TheHive using an RPM or DEB package, deploy it using an Ansible script, use Docker, install it from a binary or build it from sources.

Support

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? No worries, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

 

Mellifera 2 Released: Make MISP Sync Great Again

The Chefs behind TheHive Project’s delicious code are happy to announce the availability of Mellifera 2 (TheHive v2.11.2),  the scalable, free and open source Security Incident Response Platform. This minor version fixes two irking issues related to MISP and adds a few enhancements detailed below.

Alerts_Panel.png
Mellifera – The New Alerting Panel

Fixed Issues

  • #220: alerts related to MISP events are not properly updated.
  • #221: in some edge cases, alerts related to MISP events are created with no attribute.

Enhancements

  • #188: display the case severity in the My tasks and the Waiting tasks pages to let analysts prioritize their work.
  • #218: show the description of an alert in the alerting panel.
  • #224: visually distinguish between analyzed and non-analyzed observables.

Download & Get Down to Work

If you have an existing TheHive installation, please follow the new migration guide.

If you are performing a fresh installation, read the installation guide corresponding to your needs and enjoy. Please note that you can install TheHive using an RPM or DEB package, deploy it using an Ansible script, use Docker, install it from a binary or build it from sources.

Support

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? No worries, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

Correction: May 26, 2017

A copy/paste error from a previous blog post was fixed.

Cortex 1.1.2 Released

We are glad to announce a new version of your favorite observable analysis engine which corrects bugs introduced by version 1.1.1 and adds a few enhancements. As a reminder, TheHive, our Security Incident Response Platform, can interact with one or several Cortex instances. Moreover, starting from version 1.1.1, Cortex has a two-way integration with MISP.

We highly advise you to upgrade your Cortex in to instance to 1.1.2.

Screen Shot 2017-05-24 at 11.51.54.png
Cortex 1.1.2 – Job Report Example with CERT-SG’s Abuse Finder

Fixed Issues

  • #27: fixed the daunting error 500 that many users of  TheHive encountered when a job is submitted to Cortex.
  • #29: the MISP expansion modules are now disabled by default to avoid another error 500.
  • #31: the web interface was displaying SNAPSHOT (oops!) for the Cortex version.  It now displays the correct version.

Enhancements

  • #28: when you enable the MISP expansion modules, Cortex will not be slowed down and starts without delay.
  • #30: add a page loader mask similar to TheHive’s.

Download & Get Down to Work

To update your current Cortex installation, follow the instructions of the installation guide. Before doing so, you may want to save the job reports that were not executed via TheHive. Cortex 1 has no persistence and restarting the service will wipe out any existing reports.

Please note that you can install Cortex using an RPM or DEB package, deploy it using an Ansible script, use Docker, install it from a binary or build it from sources.

Support

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? No worries, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

VMRay, FireHOL, Joe Sandbox & Fortiguard Analyzers

We are pleased to announce the availability of 2 new Cortex analyzers and an update to 2 existing ones:

  • New: VMRay and FireHOL
  • Updated: Joe Sandbox and Fortiguard URL Category

We would like to thank Nils Kuhnert from CERT-BUND, CERT-BDF and Eric Capuano for their precious contributions.

To install the new analyzers, grab the Cortex-Analyzers repository and unpack its content (or git pull the master  branch) in your existing /path/to/cortex-analyzers. Then follow the Cortex analyzers guide.

To import the new report templates in your instance of TheHive:

  • download the updated package
  • log in TheHive using an administrator account
  • go to Admin > Report templates menu
  • click on Import templates button and select the downloaded package

VMRay

The VMRay analyzer has been submitted by Nils Kunhert from CERT-BUND. It lets you run a file in a local or remote (cloud) VMRay sandbox. The analyzer also lets you check existing analysis reports.

The analyzer accepts files and hashes as input. VMRay is a commercial service and you need an API key to run the analyzer. To make it work, install the requests Python library. It should already have been installed since it is used by other analyzers as well.

To use the analyzer, add the following section to the Cortex configuration file (application.conf):

VMRay {
 url = ""
 key = ""
 certpath = ""
 }

When called from TheHive, the following output is produced:

sc-short-vmray.png

sc-long-vmray.png
TheHive: VMRay Analyzer – Short and Long Report Samples

Important note: an analysis on VMRay, like on any other sandbox, can take a long time. That is why the analyzer tries to fetch the report until it is ready.

FireHOL

The FireHOL analyzer has been submitted by Nils Kuhnert from CERT-BUND. It lets you use the lists maintained by FireHOL project and check if an IP resides in one of them. FireHOL is an open source project. The analyzer reports the block lists in which an IP resides with the latest updated ones displayed first. To make it work, you’ll need to download the lists in a directory first (and it would be wise to do it on a regular fashion using a cron entry for example):

git clone https://github.com/firehol/blocklist-ipsets

The FireHOL analyzer depends on the following librairies:

ipaddress
pytz
dateutil
datetime

Add the following section to the Cortex configuration file (application.conf) to activate the analyzer:

FireHOLBlocklists {
 blocklistpath = ""
 ignoreolderthandays = <int>
 }

The ignoreolderthandays parameter lets you tell the analyzer to ignore matches found in lists that have not been refreshed in <int> days where <int> is an integer.

When called from TheHive, the following output is produced:

sc-short-fireHOL.png

sc-long-firehol.png

TheHive: FireHOL Analyzer – Short and Long Report Samples

Joe Sandbox

Thanks to CERT-BDF, the Joe Sandbox analyzer has been updated to support Joe Sandbox Cloud service beside the on-premises version (Ultimate). Like with other Joe Sandbox services, you need to add the following section to the Cortex configuration file (application.conf):

JoeSandbox {
 url = ""
 apikey = ""
 }

Fortiguard URL Category

Thanks to Eric Capuano, the Fortiguard URL Category analyzer is working again. Eric has modified it to handle the changes made by Fortiguard to their free online API.

Correction: May 23, 2017
An earlier version of this post used ignoredays instead of ignoreolderthandays for the FireHOL Blocklists analyzer. This parameter has also been described.

Cortex 1.1.1: Two Way MISP Integration Now a Reality

TheHive Project’s Chefs are thrilled to announce the immediate availability of Cortex 1.1.1.

Starting from this version, Cortex can be integrated in two ways with MISP as described below. We would like to thank Alexandre Dulaunoy for inviting us to the Open Source Security Software Hackathon which took place in Luxembourg during two days (May 2-3, 2017). Andras Iklody worked with us during the event in order to make this two way integration a reality. Merci !

Now in addition to TheHive, our Security Incident Response Platform which can connect to multiple MISP instances to receive new or updated events, let analysts preview then import them if they deem them worth investigating, Cortex can query MISP modules or be invoked from MISP to let an instance’s users leverage the power of its 21 analyzers. And in the near future, TheHive will also gain the ability to export observables to MISP.

Invoke MISP modules within Cortex

Besides its regular analyzers, Cortex 1.1.1  can analyze observables using MISP expansion modules.

Obviously, there are some overlap between Cortex native analyzers and MISP expansion modules. For example, you could query the CIRCL’s Passive DNS service using a native Cortex analyzer or a MISP expansion module. When there’s overlap, we highly recommend you rely on the Cortex analyzer. That way, we will be able to better help you in case you encounter issues or need help to make it work.

In order to invoke MISP expansion modules within Cortex, they need to be installed on the same host that Cortex runs on. Please read the MISP Integration guide.

Invoke Cortex Analyzers within MISP

Starting from version 2.4.73, a MISP instance can invoke Cortex analyzers. To do so, connect to the MISP Web UI with sufficient privileges, then go to Administration > Server settings > Plugin settings. Edit the Cortex section as follows:

  • set Plugin.Cortex_services_enable to true
  • set Plugin.Cortex_services_url  to http://ip_address (replace ip_address with the IP address of Cortex)
  • set Plugin.Plugin.Cortex_services_port to port (replace port with the port on which Cortex is listening: 9000 by default)

Once this operation is completed, the Cortex analyzer list should appear in MISP’s Cortex section. The analyzers must be enabled to make them available to the instance users.

Documentation

Please note that we have moved all the documentation of Cortex to a new repository.

Download & Get Down to Work

To update your current Cortex installation, follow the instructions of the installation guide. Before doing so, you may want to save the job reports that were not executed via TheHive. Cortex 1 has no persistence and restarting the service will wipe out any existing reports.

Please note that you can install Cortex using an RPM or DEB package, deploy it using an Ansible script, use Docker, install it from a binary or build it from sources.

Support

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? No worries, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

Correction: May 18, 2017
An earlier version of this post contained a few typos which were corrected.