The Dead don’t Die

In December 2017, we published a fix for a nasty privilege escalation vulnerability, namely THP-SEC-ADV-2017-001.

On Tuesday May 21, 2019, it came back to bite us like a dead that doesn’t die when Adam Mariš reported it was still possible to do a privilege escalation in all versions of TheHive, including version 3.3.0.

After analysis, we found that THP-SEC-ADV-2017-001 did not address the full scope of the vulnerability. Adam hit the nail on the head – be like Adam! 👏

We have released a hotfix for the last version of TheHive which completely puts the dead to rest once and for all and we sincerely apologise for the issue.

What’s THP-SEC-ADV-2017-001?

The vulnerability allows users with read-only or read/write access to escalate their privileges and eventually become administrators. To exploit it, an attacker must have access to an account on TheHive with read-only or read/write privileges.

The attacker needs to interact with the API in a specific yet trivial way to obtain administrator privileges. After verifying that their request has been correctly processed, they connect to TheHive using the Web UI and they will see the administrator menu from where they can edit or lock user accounts, add case templates, etc.

And Now What?

We highly recommend you to update to TheHive 3.3.1 which completely fixes the vulnerability. If you are still using TheHive 2.x and have not made the move to TheHive 3 yet, please update to TheHive 2.13.4 which also addresses this flaw.

If you cannot immediately apply the hotfixes we have released, a shell script is still available and will allow you to spot anyone who exploited the vulnerability. You can download this script from the following location:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1F8VOUMLoCVnIdHjnbhMTzf_9Z2Ud_Vuw/view?usp=sharing

The SHA256 hash of the script is:

18c74f921b92cc68ea7bc10c7522691d671074331191fe22269cc936bfdb0e9a

When you run the script, it will display all users that have changed their roles. If a single match is found, it means your  instance has been potentially compromised. We advise you to create a crontab which will execute the script on a regular basis until you apply the hotfixes.

If you are performing a fresh installation, read the installation guide corresponding to your needs and enjoy. Please note that you can install TheHive using an RPM or DEB package, use Docker, install it from a binary or build it from sources.

If you are using TheHive 3.x, upgrade to TheHive 3.3.1 by updating the binary package on your system.

Support

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? No worries, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

Keep on Believing

Dear Users,

In the apology we posted last week, we promised you that we’ll come up with a concrete action plan to address our embarrassing miscalculation which left you running an outdated, potentially vulnerable Elasticsearch 5.6 instance to have your daily dose of your favourite Security Incident Response Platform (TheHive, n’est-ce pas ?) and its analysis and orchestration companion (Cortex, what else?).

Well, guess what? We are going to deliver on that promise and we will pay back not only our Elastic debt but also, and as described in our previous post, update the rather old AngularJS version we were using to the latest one.

What Have Been Done so Far on TheHive

We have almost completed TheHive 3.4.0-RC1, the next release candidate of TheHive, which will support ES 6 but also ES 5.6 to give you enough time to migrate before dropping the support of this dead software in the next major version (see below).

AngularJS and its sub projects have been upgraded to 1.7.8, the latest 1.x version as of this writing. Additionally, Grunt build dependencies have also been updated to their latest compatible versions.

What about Cortex?

Cortex 3, which is still a release candidate at this stage, has also been made compatible with ES 6 and 5.6. AngularJS and its sub projects have also been upgraded to 1.7.8.

If you are using Cortex 2, you will need to upgrade to the final release of Cortex 3.0.0 to get ES6 support (or to the next RC if you are a daring soul). Cortex 3 does not introduce breaking changes that would make the upgrade a hair-splitting process and you would still be able to use Cortex 2’s non-dockerized analyzers and configuration. We will provide a step-by-step migration guide in due time.

What is Going to Happen Next?

If we set the oven’s temperature right, TheHive 3.4.0-RC1 and Cortex 3.0.0-RC3 should be at your favourite cyberbakery sometime next week, for free as usual. And of course, we’ll give you a shout out as soon as we hear the ding sound indicating that cooking time is over.

We’ll detail how to taste these fresh pieces of code but to put it simply, a new version of elastic4play will be installed as part of the upgrade process and a migration step will occur. You can start by upgrading ES 5.6 to the latest version of ES 6 then update TheHive and Cortex or do it the other way around. You’ll be in control.

Any Regressions?

Well, *cough*, since you’ve asked, we feel compelled to answer:

  • TheHive and Cortex will use HTTP transport (9200/tcp by default) to connect to Elasticsearch instead of its native binary protocol (9300/tcp by default).
  • SSL/TLS, including when using a client certificate, can be configured to connect securely to ES. However this has not been tested yet.
  • Support of X-Pack and Search Guard is discontinued for anything but basic and SSL client authentication, which would still work (but we haven’t got around to check that yet).

How Can You Help

Easy! when we’ll tell you it’s time to take TheHive 3.4.0-RC1 and Cortex 3.0.0-RC3 for a spin, please do so and test them as thoroughly as possible. The better you test and report back any issues you encounter, the faster we’ll be able to polish the final releases for production environments.

Now all you gotta do is to sit tight, grab some popcorn and wait for the next episode of Game of Neurones.

A Short Story of Getting Work Done: TheHive 3.3.0

Some of our die-hard fans noticed that we silently released TheHive 3.3.0 a few days ago, after six release candidates. Well. Silently won’t be the right word to use in this case as we are drowning under work and feature requests and we sometimes postpone communication in favour of getting true real work done.

So, without any further ado, we are happy to announce the official availability of our latest (and of course greatest) release of the most-advanced, next-gen, HI (Human Intelligence), gluten-free, (add here any keyword that you fancy to help us get the Gartner attention and land in the Magic Quadrant™), free and open source Security Incident Response Platform Security Orchestration Automation & Response Platform.

As stated earlier, TheHive 3.3.0 went through the largest number of release candidates to date in order to ensure it contains more features than bugs (or unexpected functionality as our dear Nabil call them sometimes).

Since RC5 which we have blogged about on Feb 26, 2019, below is an outline of the changes we made. Check TheHive Installation Guide for installation instructions.

The new Related Alerts tab in Case View introduced in 3.3.0-RC5

Fixed Issues

  • #899: fix a crashing issue encountered with Firefox
  • #907: dynamic (auto-refresh) of cases was broken in 3.3.0-RC5
  • #930: merging cases by CaseID was broken

Implemented Enhancements

  • #666: add support for filtering tags by prefix and wildcard search
  • #901: remove the possibility of creating cases from scratch (i.e. empty cases) when explicitly disabled by an admin
  • #908: add support for text-based widgets to the dashboards
  • #912: responders can now add tags to alerts when triggered thanks to the new AddTagToAlert operation

Looking for Help?

Something does not work as expected? Then please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org.

Since You are Here

TheHive and Cortex are a huge success. According to our estimates, there are about a hundred organisations of different sizes and locations using or testing them. And as the number of users grows, so does the number of features, professional service and support requests. 

We tried finding a solution to keep TheHive Project as healthy as possible. So we created Creative Source, a nonprofit organisation (NPO), in the hope that we could leverage it to hire more developers thanks to the generous donations of our large user community. Sadly, not everyone in this world is generous and altruistic. At the end, all but one company (yes, exactly one) trusted us enough to make a donation and get tailored services for its needs in return. Most of the others either did not reply to our proposals or explained that their procurement process does not accommodate working with NPOs.

As we informed you a few weeks ago, some members of our core team are finalising an alternative option to ensure not only the viability of TheHive and Cortex as FOSS products on the long run but the ability to provide professional training, support, and services without making highly bureaucratic, think-in-the-box-but-never-outside procurement departments freak out.

Expect to hear from us soon…

On Spring, Bees and Cortex-Analyzers 1.16.0

Spring is here and your favorite bees are busy buzzing flowers to prepare you the most palatable honey ever. In the meantime, we are pleased to announce the immediate availability of Cortex-Analyzers 1.16.0, which adds a new responder and three new analyzers to complete an already hefty collection, bringing the total to 117 analyzers and 3 responders!

Release Overview

One responder has been added:

  • FalconCustomIOC, contributed by Michael (#421). We don’t know the last name of Michael. That could be Jordan. Who knows?

Three analyzers have been added:

We could not duly test some of these additions due to lack of access to the associated services or to our legendary laziness. So we would really appreciate it if you could test them and let us know whether they work or not.

FalconCustomIOC

The FalconCustomIOC responder let you submit observables from alerts or cases to Crowdstrike Falcon Custom IOC service.

Crowdstrike Falcon is a paid service. An account and an API key are required to configure and run this responder.

AbuseIPDB

AbuseIPDB analyzer let you determine wether an IP has been reported as malicious or not to the AbuseIPDB web service.

An account and an API key is needed to configure and use this analyzer.

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

AbuseIPDB: short report
AbuseIPDB: long report

BackscatterIO

The BackscatterIO analyzer lets you query the Backscatter.io service for IPs, networks or autonomous systems (AS). It comes in two flavors:

  • BackscatterIO_GetObservations: determine whether an observables has a known scanning activity
  • BackscatterIO_Enrichment: enrich your observables with additional information

TheHive displays this analyzer results as follow:

Backscatter.io:short report
Backscatter.io GetObservations: long report
Bascatter.io GetObservations: long report

SoltraEdge

SoltraEdge analyzer lets you query any observable against theSoltra Edge platform.

To configure and use this analyzer, an account, a token key and the base URL of a SoltraEdge server are needed.

TheHive displays this analyzers result as follow:

SoltraEdge: short report
SoltraEdge: long report

Get It While Supply Lasts!

Each analyzer and responder comes with its own, pip compatible requirements.txt file. To update your Cortex analyzers to 1.16.0, run the following commands:

cd path/to/Cortex-Analyzers
git pull
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip2 install -U -r $I || true; done && \
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

for I in responders/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

Once done, do not forget to login to Cortex as an orgadmin and click on the Refresh Analyzers button. Refer to the online Cortex documentation for further details.

Update TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, you must import the new report templates in your instance as follows:

  • download the updated package
  • log in TheHive using an administrator account
  • go to Admin > Report templates menu
  • click on Import templates button and select the downloaded package

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

Cortex-Analyzers 1.15.3 get ready for URLhaus and Cuckoo

Few improvements have been introduced in this version :

  • Proofpoint analyzer has been updated to use python3 (#417)
  • Long report of Cuckoo Sandbox analyzer has been improved to be able to display Cuckoo v. 2.0.6 reports (#418)
  • URLhaus analyzer has also been updated to use the recently introduced API (#431)

On your Cortex server, update your analyzers with the following command:

$ cd /opt/Cortex-Analyzers && git pull
$ for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H /usr/bin/python2 -m pip install -r $I
$ for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H /usr/bin/python3 -m pip install -r $I

Updating analyzers should be followed by also updating report templates. Download new report templates and add the archive in TheHive report templates.

Detailed information

Cuckoo Sandbox

Thanks to @nicpenning Cuckoo analyzer is now able to display reports from version  2.0.6 of Cuckoo. With this version, remote connections part of the report has been fixed and is now well displayed

The new cuckoo analyzer template

Notice: This fix has been reviewed by our core team, unfortunately, we have not been able to test it.

URLhaus

Abuse.ch, the operator of URLhaus recently introduced a new API for their service in order to handle bulk queries and reduce costs for their main page that uses CDNs for delivery. Because of that, thanks to Nils Kuhnert, the URLhaus analyzer has been rewritten from scratch. Also, the templates changed because there are three different API endpoints used:

The short reports now display the threat type – which currently is always malware_download and, for the hash observable type, the malware family – if given by URLhaus:

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

Here comes the Sun (and TheHive 3.3-RC5)

On February 10, 2019, we released TheHive 3.3-RC2. It contained new features such as bulk alert merging, alert sorting, observable tag autocompletion, exporting case tags to MISP & more. Since then your favourite French code Chefs have been beesy refining TheHive 3.3 through new release candidates while getting Cortex 3 ready for prime time.

Over the weekend, Nabil decided he was not working enough already during the week. So he drained his batteries to the very last drop to release TheHive 3.3-RC5 before he crashed headfirst into his bed for a long, reparative sleep. Cumulatively since RC2, we added several features and squashed 10 bugs as described below.

Note that release candidates are beta software. You can get TheHive 3.3-RC5 from the pre-release, beta repositories. As usual, we encourage you to test it and report any bugs or issues you spot so we can address them before the final release. 

Check TheHive Installation guide for further details.

New Features

  • #485: disable clickable widgets when editing a dashboard.
  • #820: provide direct access to MISP events for those alerts that have been generated from such events.
Direct access to the MISP event from which this alert has been generated from
  • #829: improve password-protected ZIP imports.
  • #831: add auto-completion to case and observable tags in their respective Details pages.
  • #838: when you add an observable that already exists in another case, indicate whether the existing observable is an IOC or not.
  • #870: provide a link to copy the alert ID to the clipboard which allows you to easily manipulate an alert through TheHive4py.
Now the Alert ID can be directly copied to the clipboard without resorting to your browser dev mode
  • #884: add a Related Alerts tab to the Case view.
The new Related Alerts tab in Case View
  • #888: add a new UI configuration admin section. One of the first use cases of this section consist in disabling creating empty cases (i.e. cases not associated with a template). It will be gradually improved with new use cases so speak your mind!
  • #893: disable the case template selection when trying to merge multiple alerts for which no case template exists.
  • #897: mouseover text for alert preview.

Fixed Bugs

  • #856: various fixes related to alert updates and, when applicable, associated cases.
  • #869: use the observable TLP instead of the case TLP to decide whether a Cortex responder could be executed or not.
  • #871: fix log messages for MISP synchronisation.
  • #874: fix typo in alert labels (credits: Zachary Priddy).
  • #877: fix Akka version mismatch (credits: Zachary Priddy).
  • #890: the Hide Empty Case button in the new UI admin section was broken.
  • #894: when clicking on a donut or a widget in the dashboards, this should take you to the search page with predefined filters, without generating errors.
  • #895: exclude responder jobs from search results.
  • #896: dashboard clicks are not correctly translated into tag filters.

Looking for Help?

Something does not work as expected? Then please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org.

UnshortenLink, SSRF and Cortex-Analyzers 1.15.2

We urge our fellow fighters of cybercrime and funny and not-so-funny animals-in-disguise, to update their Cortex analyzers to the latest 1.15.2 version which plugs a serious vulnerability in the Unshortenlink analyzer and fixes several bugs.

Unshortenlink Vulnerability

On Jan 24, Alexandre Basquin discovered a SSRF vulnerability in the Unshortenlink 1.0 analyzer. By exploiting it, an attacker which has access to a Cortex instance with an analyze role can scan the ports of localhost and possibly of all the hosts reachable by Cortex. This could be automated through Cortex4py by making repetitive calls to the API and thus scanning multiple ports & hosts. In essence, the attacker can perform reconnaissance thanks to Unshortenlink and gain knowledge on which ports are open and which aren’t.

Version 1.1 of Unshortenlink, included in Cortex-Analyzers 1.15.2, plugs this vulnerability by disabling submissions containing IPs & ports. Only URLs are now accepted.

Bug Fixes

Additionally, Cortex-Analyzers 1.15.2 corrects the following bugs:

  • #416: the Mailer responder now supports UTF-8 encoding.
  • #410: remove wrapping of the results produced by crt.sh as a list which ends up breaking the output of the report template. Contributed by Thomas Kastner.
  • #409: enum is not required for Python 3.4+ to make the MISP Search analyzer work.
  • #408: FileInfo’s Manalyze plugin did not work after Manalyze renamed plugin_btcaddress to plugin_cryptoaddress.
  • #406: fix a broken link in the Cymon_Check_IP report, submitted by Manabu Niseki.
  • #313: fix wrong file handling in OTXQuery.

How to Update your Analyzers?

To update your analyzers to version 1.15.2, please read the Updating section of the Cortex installation guide.

Since the version numbers of few analyzers have changed, you’ll need to connect as an orgadmin to Cortex to refresh the analyzer list, disabling old ones and enabling the new versions.

TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, you must import the new report templates in your instance as follows:

  • download the updated package
  • log in TheHive using an administrator account
  • go to Admin > Report templates menu
  • click on Import templates button and select the downloaded package

Wait a Minute! Where’s the Blog Post about 1.15.1?

Good catch! There was no blog post about Cortex-Analyzers 1.15.1. Call us lazy but there was nothing Earth-shattering, pole-shifting in that release. Nonetheless, here are a list of fixes included in that release and from which you’ll inherit automatically if you update 1.15.0 to 1.15.2 directly:

  • #402: Malwares analyzer code relied on functionality that’s only available in Python 3.7+. It has been fixed to work with 3.4 and up thanks to the work of Arcuri Davide.
  • #404: fixes a bad folder renaming in the HIBP (Have I Been Pwned) analyzer.
  • #398: MISP Search analyzer wouldn’t run without the enum dependency. Contributed by Mars Huang. Later improved in 1.15.2 (see above).

No Luck Luke?

If something does not work as expected, keep calm and ask on our user forum, reach out to fellow users on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org.