More than 120 ways of Analyzing your Observables

There’s a new version of Cortex-Analyzers in cybertown and its has an awesome, mind-blowing name and that’s… wait for it… wait for it: 2.1.0.

In this new release, we added two analyzers which bring the total number to more than 120:

We could not duly test DNSSinkhole since we do not have access to the associated service. So we would really appreciate it if you could test it and let us know whether it works or not.

Others analyzers have been fixed or improved:

DNSSinkhole

This analyzer lets you check if an IP address has been registered in your DNS sinkhole. TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

DNSSinkhole analyzer: long report
DNSSinkhole analyzer: short report

TalosReputation

This analyzer lets you determine whether an IP address has been reported as a threat on Cisco Talos Intelligence service. No special access to the service is required to run the analyzer.

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

Talos Reputation: long report
Talos Reputation analyzer : short report

Crt.sh

This analyzer has been enriched to display SHA-1 fingerprints. The long report format has been updated to reflect this new information.

Crt.sh analyzer: long report

FileInfo

FileInfo has been updated and is now able to parse PDF files and extract IOCs such as URLs, hosts, domains, IPs, hashes and many more.The analyzer does also support the last version of the extract-msg library.

FileInfo analyzer: IOC Parser long report
FileInfo analyzer: IOC Parser short report

VirusTotal and Python3

The VirusTotal analyzer, including all its flavours, now uses Python3 and an updated virustotal-api library.

Yeti API key

An optional API key can now be configured and used by the Yeti analyzer.

Malwares_GetReport

A hash computation has been fixed in this analyzer.

EMLParser

A first fix has been introduced to avoid this analyzer to crash when there is no content-description in content_header, and a second has been added to correct a header display issue.

IBM XForce Lookup

The analyzer has been improved to allow users to add a trailing / at the end of the API URL without breaking everything.

Updating your Analyzers in Cortex 2.x

Each analyzer and responder comes with its own, pip compatible requirements.txt file. Run the following commands to update your Cortex analyzers to the latest version:

cd path/to/Cortex-Analyzers
git pull
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip2 install -U -r $I || true; done && \
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

for I in responders/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

Once done, do not forget to login to Cortex as an orgadmin and click on the Refresh Analyzers button. Refer to the online Cortex documentation for further details.

Dockerised Analyzers

Cortex 3.x gives you the opportunity to run dockerised analyzers and responders. This means that you no longer have to download all the git repository of Cortex-Analyzers and run lengthy commands to update your analyzers and responders.

If you want to use dockerised analyzers and responders, ensure that the URL of the catalog.json file corresponding to the Cortex-Analyzers repository is registered in application.conf. Please note that this won’t work if you are tracking the stable catalog.

After doing so, do not forget to login to Cortex as an orgadmin, click on the Refresh Analyzers button, then Disable and Enable again each analyzer and responder. Analyzer (and responder) updates should occur automatically as long as docker.autoUpdate is set to true in application.conf (this is the default setting).

Update TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, you must import the new report templates in your instance as follows:

  • download the updated package
  • log in TheHive using an administrator account
  • go to Admin > Report templates menu
  • click on Import templates button and select the downloaded package

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

C’est La Vie !

Earlier today, we released Mellifera 12.1. Shortly after, we published 3 new Cortex analyzers: WOT, YETI and Cuckoo Sandbox.

It’s time for us to rest. We are closing* TheHive’s code kitchen for most of August 2017 to enjoy all what France has to offer: wine (obviously), literature, beaches, mountains, gorgeous food, and a unique savoir vivre. 

So keep calm and eat croissants. 

7077fd0ed647dcfb44c46cad88680f7d.jpg
Source : Pinterest

See you back soon. Au revoir !

(*) Bear with us as we will be particularly slow to respond to support and feature requests as well as Gitter queries.

WOT? Did You See a Yeti Hugging a Cuckoo?

While many are enjoying the summer holidays, the busy bees of TheHive Project have been working hard lately to develop new Cortex analyzers and review few of those submitted by our growing and thriving user community, bringing the grand total to 27. Yes, you read that right. Cortex can leverage 27 analyzers to help you analyze observables very simply in many different ways.

The latest update to the Cortex-analyzers repository contains 3 new analyzers: Yeti, Cuckoo Sandbox and WOT, described below. And your first step to benefit from them should consist of refreshing your master working copy on your Cortex instance:

$ cd where/your/analyzers/are
$ git pull master

Yeti

YETI is a FOSS platform meant to organize observables, indicators of compromise, TTPs, and knowledge on threats in a single, unified repository.  It is mainly developed by fellow APT busters Thomas Chopitea and Gael Muller (who said France doesn’t produce good software?).

The new Cortex analyzer for this platform lets you make API calls to YETI and retrieve all available information pertaining to a domain, a fully qualified domain name, an IP address, a URL or a hash.

To be able to use the analyzer edit the Cortex configuration file (/etc/cortex/application.conf) and add the following lines:

Yeti {
    # URL of the Yeti server: example: http://120.0.0.1:5000
    url = ""
}

When called from TheHive, the following output is produced:

sc-YETI-short.png

sc-YETI-long.png
TheHive: YETI analyzer — Short and Long Report Samples

CuckooSandox

The Cuckoo Sandbox analyzer has been submitted by Andrea Garavaglia (Thanks!) and you can use it to analyze files and URLs with Cuckoo Sandbox.

By default, we chose to limit analysis to TLP:WHITE and TLP:GREEN observables for OPSEC reasons, in case your Cuckoo server provides Internet access to potentially harmful files. If you want to use it with TLP:AMBER or TLP:RED observables, edit CuckooSanbox_File_analysis.json or CuckooSanbox_URL_analysis.json and change the max_tlp parameter to 2 or 3.

To use the analyzer, edit the Cortex configuration file and add the following lines:

CuckooSandbox {
   url = “http://mycuckoosandbox”
}

When called from TheHive, the following output is produced:

sc-CSB-short.png

sc-CSB-long.png
TheHive: Cuckoo Sandbox Analyzer — Short and Long Report Samples

WOT

The WOT analyzer was also submitted by Andrea Garavaglia (kudos!). Use it to check reputation of a given domain on the Web of Trust service. It takes domains and FQDNs as input.

An API key is needed to use this service, and has to be added in the Cortex configuration file:

WOT {
    # API key of the Web of Trust account
    key=“”
}

When called from TheHive, the following output is produced:

sc-WOT-short.png.png

sc-WOT-long.png.png
TheHive: WOT Analyzer — Short and Long Report Samples

Support

Something does not work as expected? No worries, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.