TheHive4py 1.5.1 Released

When you need to interact with TheHive’s REST API and you ain’t shy of working with Python, TheHive4py is the way to go. It’s a free, open source library we provide to allow you to easily create alert feeders, automate certain tasks like creating cases, assign them to analysts and much more. For example, Synapse, DigitalShadows2TH and Zerofox2TH leverage the library to send alerts to your favourite SIRP/SOAR.

Sometime ago, we decided that it was time to overhaul the whole library and we began working on version 2.0.0 which will be easier to use. It should also support the full set of TheHive’s REST API calls. In the meantime we decided to release version 1.5.0, shortly followed by version 1.5.1 to support some new functionality contributed by our user community and correct a few issues.

code_quality
Source : XKCD

New Features Introduced in 1.5.0

Bugfixes Introduced in 1.5.0

  • #80: Prevent max recursion depth exceeded error, contributed by Psynbiotik

New Features Introduced in 1.5.1

Important note: TheHive4py 1.5.1 does not work with TheHive 3.0.10 or earlier versions. Please stick with 1.5.0 if you are using those versions.

Updating/Installing

To update your existing package:

$ sudo pip install thehive4py --upgrade

If you are just getting started with TheHive4py, you can forgo the --upgrade at the end of the command above.

But I just Wanna Play!

If you’d like to play around with TheHive4py 1.5.1, TheHive 3.1.1., Cortex4py 2.0.1 and Cortex 2.1.1, please download the training VM.

Paris? Are you There?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. As usual, we’ll be more than happy to help!

Correction: October 12, 2018
As reported by Robin Hahling, TheHive 1.5.1 does not work with TheHive 3.0.10 or earlier versions.

Privilege Escalation Vulnerability in All Versions of TheHive

Jeffrey Everling has identified a nasty privilege escalation vulnerability in all versions of TheHive, including Mellifera 13.2 (TheHive 2.13.2) and Cerana 0.2 (TheHive 3.0.2). Jeffrey reported it to us today Friday, Dec 22, 2017. Thanks but we could think of a better Christmas gift 😉

The vulnerability allows users with read-only or read/write access to escalate their privileges and eventually become administrators. To exploit it, an attacker must have access to an account on TheHive with read-only or read/write privileges.

The attacker needs to interact with the API in a specific though trivial way to obtain administrator privileges. After verifying that their request has been correctly processed, they connect to TheHive using the Web UI and they will see the administrator menu from where they can edit or lock user accounts, add case templates, etc.

We highly recommend you update TheHive to Cerana 0.3 (TheHive 3.0.3) which fixes the vulnerability. If you are still using Mellifera and have not made the move to Cerana yet, please update to Mellifera 13.3 (TheHive 2.13.3) which also corrects this flaw.

If you cannot immediately apply the hotfixes we have released, we have created a shell script that will allow you to spot anyone who exploited the vulnerability. You can download the script from the following location:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1F8VOUMLoCVnIdHjnbhMTzf_9Z2Ud_Vuw/view?usp=sharing

The SHA256 hash of the script is:

18c74f921b92cc68ea7bc10c7522691d671074331191fe22269cc936bfdb0e9a

When you run the script, it will display all users that have changed their roles. If single match is found, it means your  instance  has  been  potentially compromised. We advise you to create a crontab which will execute the script on a regular basis until you apply the hotfixes.

To Upgrade to Cerana 0.3 (TheHive 3.0.3)

Start by following the migration guide.

If you are performing a fresh installation, read the installation guide corresponding to your needs and enjoy. Please note that you can install TheHive using an RPM or DEB package, use Docker, install it from a binary or build it from sources.

To Upgrade to Mellifera 13.3 (TheHive 2.13.3)

DEB Package

wget https://dl.bintray.com/cert-bdf/debian/TheHive_2.13.3-1_all.deb​​​​​dpkg -i TheHive_2.13.3-1_all.deb

The SHA256 hash of the DEB package is:

68c606fb9cbd56f63ba1f2d29c7f7652f4848c7783a6da574532bed0c963829b

RPM Package

wget https://dl.bintray.com/cert-bdf/rpm/thehive-2.13.3-1.noarch.rpm
rpm -Uvh thehive-2.13.3-1.noarch.rpm

The SHA256 hash of the RPM package is:

e566418bf861b2bf28842cf92f5c5d475c98fee1a3ae0d65e3990fd061a0bce0

Docker

docker run certbdf/thehive:2.13.3-1

Binary Package

wget https://dl.bintray.com/cert-bdf/thehive/thehive-2.13.3.zip

The SHA256 hash of the binary package is:

54c589f929744096b50d01264b9d4cc8b9e3d30d397fe810879b4d16b81287c1

Unzip the file in the folder of your choosing.

Support

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? No worries, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

Cortex 2: a Sneak Peek

Unless you’ve been living in a cave with no Internet connection during the last year or so, you certainly know a thing or two about Cortex, TheHive’s perfect sidekick, which allows you to analyze observables, at scale, using its 30+ analyzers.

As of this writing, the latest version of Cortex is 1.1.4. Cortex can be queried using its Web UI for quick assessment of an observable. But the true power of Cortex is unleashed when the engine is queried through its REST API, either from TheHive (which can leverage multiple Cortex instances), from alternative SIRPs (Security Incident Response Platforms), Threat Intelligence Platforms and programs thanks to Cortex4py. Indeed, when Cortex is called through the API, it can analyze large sets of observables. Each analysis generates a job. Jobs are queued on first-created, first-executed basis.

However, Cortex 1 has three limitations:

  1. It does not support authentication. If you install it and don’t shield it from abuse (using a firewall for example), anyone can submit analysis jobs and consume your query quotas for subscription-based, commercial services, for example. Non-CSIRT/CERT/SOC personnel or threat actors can also view all the jobs you’ve executed (what observables you have analyzed, using which analyzers and what the associated results were).
  2. It does not support rate-limiting. All it takes to ruin your quotas is an unexperienced analyst who’d create a case in TheHive from a MISP event containing thousands of attributes, select them all from the newly created case, and run them through various Cortex analyzers.
  3. It has no persistence. If you restart the Cortex service or the host it runs on, all your analysis results will disappear. Please note that if you query Cortex from TheHive, the latter will keep a copy of all the reports generated by the analyzers.

Moreover, analyzer configuration is not as easy as we’d like it to be. Enters Cortex 2.

Authentication, Organizations, Configuration and Rate Limiting

Cortex 2, due for release in February 2018, almost a year after the release of the first version, will support all the authentication methods TheHive supports: LDAP, Active Directory, local accounts, API keys and/or SSO using X.509 certificates (an experimental feature as of this writing).

Once created, users will be associated to an organization. Each organization has its own configuration: which analyzers are enabled, associated API keys and/or authentication credentials for services (VirusTotal, PassiveTotal, MISP, …) and a query quota.

For example, if you have an overall quota on VT for 10,000 queries/month, you can limit the number of queries to 5000 for org A, 3000 for org B and leave 2000 for other uses. Rate limits can be configured per month or per day.

Screen Shot 2017-12-15 at 17.16.06
Cortex 2 — Architecture

More on Organizations

Organizations will be ideal for multi-tenant Cortex instances deployed, for a example, by the central CSIRT of a large company. They can then create orgs for their regional SOCs. Commercial teams such as MSSPs will also be able to use a single instance to serve all their customers.

Graphical Interface Enhancements

Administrators will not have to edit /etc/cortex/application.conf by hand to enable and configure analyzers per org. They will be able to do so from the Web UI. The Web UI will also allow them to manage users, orgs and authentication tokens when applicable.

Report Persistence and Freshness

Cortex 2 will use ES 5 for storage, like TheHive. That way, you will no longer lose your existing jobs when you reboot the Cortex host or restart the service. You will also be able to query historical results to monitor changes and so on. We will also add an optional parameter to make Cortex 2 to serve the latest report generated by an analyzer if it is called again, on the same observable in the last X seconds or minutes. That way, we’ll avoid running the same queries again and again for the same observable and thus consuming quotas and CPU and storage resources.

Pricing

Cortex 2 is a significant development over Cortex 1 … but it’ll still cost you nothing as it will remain free and open source. We could feel you itching when you started reading this paragraph. Chill out! But if you are willing to support the project, you can donate to Creative Source, the non-profit organization we have created to sustain TheHive, Cortex and Hippocampe in the long run. Interested? Contact us at support@thehive-project.org then.

TheHive4py 1.4.0 Released

Version 1.4.0 of the Python API client for TheHive is now available. It is compatible with the freshly released Cerana (TheHive 3.0.0).

We’d like to thank Nick Pratley, a frequent contributor, Bill Murrin, Alexander Gödeke and “srilumpa” for their code additions and documentation.

To update your existing package:

$ sudo pip install thehive4py --upgrade

If you are just getting started with TheHive4py, you can forgo the --upgrade at the end of the command above.

New Features

  • #5: Add a method to update a case, contributed by Nick Pratley
  • #34: Add a get_task_logs method in order to obtain all the task logs associated with a given taskId. Contributed by Bill Murrin
  • #37: A new, very cool case helper class by Nick Pratley
  • #39: Add support for custom fields to the case model
  • #40: Ability to run a Cortex analyzer through the API by Alexander Gödeke
  • #45: Simplify case creation when using a template by providing just its name
  • #49: Add a query builder capability to support TheHive’s DSL query syntax

Paris? Are you There?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. As usual, we’ll be more than happy to help!

Zerofox2TH: ZeroFOX Alert Feeder for TheHive

Earlier today, the French (but nonetheless happy) Chefs of TheHive’s code kitchen released DigitalShadows2TH, an alert feeder for TheHive that can consume incidents and intel-incidents from Digital Shadows, a Threat Intelligence provider and feed them as alerts to your favorite Security Incident Response Platform.

We are glad to do the same for ZeroFOX, a social media monitoring platform, with Zerofox2TH. If you are a ZeroFOX customer with a valid API subscription and use TheHive for managing your security incidents and investigating them, you can now feed alerts generated by ZeroFOX to TheHive. Ain’t that joli?

Zerofox2TH is released under an AGPLv3 license (read: free and open source). To use it, you’ll need Python 3, the requests and pillow libraries as well as TheHive4py. You also need TheHive 2.13 or better, with an account on your SIRP that can create alerts.

Please read the README file to learn how to install, configure and run this alert feeder.

Need Help?

Something does not work as expected? No worries, we got you covered. Please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

DigitalShadows2TH: Digital Shadows Alert Feeder for TheHive

Thanks to its REST API and alerting framework, TheHive can receive alerts from multiple sources: email notifications, SIEMs, IDS/IPS and, of course, one or several MISP instances.

While the integration with MISP is native and very easy to configure, teams need to develop their own code to feed alerts from other sources to TheHive, leveraging whenever possible TheHive4Py, a very handy Python library to interact with the API.

If you are a TheHive user and a Digital Shadows customer, you can now fetch any incident or intel-incident raised by their Searchlight service using DigitalShadows2TH, a free, open source alert feeder for TheHive freshly cooked by your friendly and so Frenchy Chefs behind TheHive Project.

To use DigitalShadows2TH, you’ll need Python 3, the requests library and TheHive4py. You also need a Digital Shadows subscription and TheHive 2.13 or better with an account on your SIRP that can create alerts.

Please read the README file to learn how to install, configure and run this alert feeder.

Need Help?

Something does not work as expected? No worries, we got you covered. Please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

 

Mellifera 12.1 Released

About a month ago, we published Mellifera 12 which brought numerous features such as mini-reports on the observable page, custom fields, alert similarity or template selection during alert imports.

Great, palatable recipes, even if they are cooked by fine French chefs, need to be refined over time and may not be as savoury as intended when they are served in their early days. Quality takes time, although smokeware vendors would have you think otherwise.

Mellifera 12.1 (TheHive 2.12.1) has been released to fix a number of outstanding bugs:

  • #249: renaming of users does not work
  • #254: TheHive does not send the file’s name when communicating with Cortex
  • #255: merging an alert into an existing case does not merge the alert description into the case’s description
  • #257: while TheHive does not let you add multiple attachments to a single task log, the UI makes you believe otherwise
  • #259: fix an API inconsistency. GET /api/case/task/:id/log has been fixed.
    And a new API call POST /api/case/task/:taskId/log/_search  has been added, which accepts a “query” in the request body to filter logs of the task.
  • #268: cannot create an alert if the IOC field is set for a single alert’s attribute.
  • #269: closing a case with an open task does not dismiss it from ‘My Tasks’.

This new minor release adds the following enhancements:

  • #267: fix warnings in the DEB package.
  • #272: in alert preview, similar cases are shown regardless of their status. Merged or deleted ones should not appear in that list.

How About the Test VM?

The test VM has not been updated yet. It still contains Mellifera 12 (TheHive 2.12.0). We will update it in September, probably when Mellifera 13 is released. That version will bring the ability to export cases as MISP events.

Download & Get Down to Work

If you have an existing installation of TheHive, please follow the migration guide.

If you are performing a fresh installation, read the installation guide corresponding to your needs and enjoy. Please note that you can install TheHive using an RPM or DEB package, use Docker, install it from a binary or build it from sources.

Support

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? No worries, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.