TheHive 3.2.0-RC1: The MISP Love Edition

Guess what? Our integration with MISP, the de facto standard for threat sharing, has just gotten better with our latest beta release: TheHive 3.2.0-RC1.

While you could synchronize TheHive with one or multiple MISP instances in earlier versions and select events using filters like their age, the number of attributes they contain or exclude those which are created by specific organisations or contain one or several black-listed tags, 3.2.0-RC1 adds the ability to whitelist tags, thus limiting the events that would show up in TheHive’s Alerts pane to only those which have been tagged with labels your SOC/CSIRT/CERT needs to act on. This can be very useful for example if your Cyber Threat Intelligence analysts pre-select or create events in MISP and tag for SOC consumption those that need to be acted on.

The Hive - Logo - Schéma - V1_Plan de travail 1.png
TheHive, Cortex, MISP: The Power DFIR & CTI Trio

To use this feature, use the whitelist.tags parameter in the MISP section of TheHive’s application.conf as described in the documentation.

This new version also adds the ability to create dashboards out of responder actions, log responder operations, and offers a confirmation dialog before running a responder to avoid noob over-clicks and errors made by seasoned incident handlers running low on caffeine.

TheHive 3.2.0-RC1 will also show you the description of an observable if any while hovering over one in the Observables tab. You can also see observable tags when previewing an alert in the Alerts pane.

Last but not least, some users reported severe problems when they enabled TLS/SSL directly on TheHive without resorting to a reverse proxy such as NGINX. Blame that on the crappy TLS support in Play framework ;-). So we highly recommend using a reverse proxy for that purpose, and delegate authentication to it if you are relying on X.509 authentication, as TheHive 3.2.0-RC1 allows you to. Please check the Single Sign-On on TheHive with X.509 Certificates guide for further information.

For additional details on this release, please check the full changelog.

Warning Capt’n Robinson!

The RC in 3.2.0-RC1 stands for Release Candidate. Please help us make a great stable release out of it by testing it as thoroughly as possible and reporting back any bugs or issues you encounter so we can address them before the final release. You’ll find this release candidate in the pre-release, beta repositories.

Please check TheHive Installation guide for further details.

You got a problem?

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? Spotted new bugs? No worries, please open issues on GitHub or comment on existing ones, join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

TheHive 3.1.2 & Cortex 2.1.2 Released

We could not leave for the week-end without issuing a minor release or two so here we go.

TheHive 3.1.2

Starting from TheHive 3.0.1, an administrator has the ability to configure Cortex job polling by defining the time between two polls thanks to the cortex.refreshDelay parameter as well as the number of consecutive failures before giving up (via cortex.MaxRetryOnError). However, these settings prevent the service from starting correctly. TheHive 3.1.2 corrects this issue.

Cortex 2.1.2

When running a job in Cortex with the exact same details, the function findSimilarJob is called. It should return results from any previous jobs, but in the latest versions (2.1.0, 2.1.1) it does not because of a change that went past our QA.

In a similar fashion, the GUI search function was broken. Cortex 2.1.2 fixes both issues.

Excuse my French but I Need Help

Keep calm. We speak French. So if you encounter any difficulty to update TheHive or Cortex, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are always ready to help as does our user community.

Cortex 2.1.0: The Response Edition

We released Cortex 2.1.0 as a release candidate back in July 31, 2018 along with TheHive 3.1.0-RC1. By then, the power duo which makes digital forensics, incident response and, to an extent, cyber threat intelligence, better, faster, happier, regular exercising gained the ability to perform active response.

We ate our own dog food for a couple of months. We found bugs. We added enhancements and we listened to the early adopters of these new major versions. And today we are thrilled to announce the availability of the stable release of Cortex 2.1.0 along with TheHive 3.1.0.

Cortex 2.1.0 restores the ability to query the analysis and response engine from MISP for enrichment purposes. A new version of the de facto standard for threat sharing should be released shortly as there are also some API-related issues on its side to make the integration fully working again.

mighty-morphin-power-rangers.jpg
Source : Consequence of Sound

Cortex 2.1.0 also gives you the ability to see the PAP (Permissible Actions Protocol) values for each analyzer as well as any custom cache values you might have configured.

You can check out the full changelog and we highly encourage you to install this new version and let us know what you think of it.

Troubles?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

 

 

TheHive 3.1.0: Fresh out of the Oven

TheHive Project’s Master Cooks are happy to announce the immediate availability of TheHive 3.1.0. This is the first release of your favourite SIRP (Security Incident Response Platform) or, if you fancy new buzzwords, SOAR (Security Orchestration, Automation & Response) that we put out as a release candidate to give sufficient time for our ever growing user community to test it and report any outstanding bug before publishing a stable version.

Indeed, TheHive 3.1.0 brings significant new functionalities that we detailed in previous blog posts. One of the most prominent features of this new major version is the support of responders through Cortex 2.1, also released today as a stable version.

Responders are similar to analyzers but instead of analyzing stuff, they allow you to respond to stuff. Put otherwise, they give you the ability to implement specific actions by a simple click from different elements in TheHive: alerts, cases, tasks, task logs and observables.

For instance, imagine a user in your constituency reporting a suspicious email. Using Synapse or an alternative alert feeder, the email reported by the user will automatically show up as an alert in your alert pane. Before starting working on it as a case, you preview it only to realise it is a scam and it does not warrant your time & effort. Still, you’d like to reply to the user.

In such a case, you could implement a responder that will not only send an email back to the user asking them to ignore such a scam but that can mark the alert as read. Using. A. Simple. Click. C’est beau n’est-ce pas ?

Going through all 71 (yes, 71) issues that have been closed with this release and the 3 RCs we published since July 31, 2018 will be terribly boring but you can read the full changelog while dipping your croissant in your espresso cup.

We’d rather encourage you to install this new version, which is as usual, AI-free, machine learning free, cyberbullshit-free, gluten-free, organic (well as much as free, open source software can be anyway), vegan (if you can eat it), and most importantly made with huge love and care for the SOC, CSIRT & CERT communities and other fellow cybercrime fighters. So go ahead and try it out. It won’t cost you a dime (or a franc if you are a French old timer).

Caum6EmUMAA6vi8

Need Help?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!