More than 120 ways of Analyzing your Observables

There’s a new version of Cortex-Analyzers in cybertown and its has an awesome, mind-blowing name and that’s… wait for it… wait for it: 2.1.0.

In this new release, we added two analyzers which bring the total number to more than 120:

We could not duly test DNSSinkhole since we do not have access to the associated service. So we would really appreciate it if you could test it and let us know whether it works or not.

Others analyzers have been fixed or improved:

DNSSinkhole

This analyzer lets you check if an IP address has been registered in your DNS sinkhole. TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

DNSSinkhole analyzer: long report
DNSSinkhole analyzer: short report

TalosReputation

This analyzer lets you determine whether an IP address has been reported as a threat on Cisco Talos Intelligence service. No special access to the service is required to run the analyzer.

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

Talos Reputation: long report
Talos Reputation analyzer : short report

Crt.sh

This analyzer has been enriched to display SHA-1 fingerprints. The long report format has been updated to reflect this new information.

Crt.sh analyzer: long report

FileInfo

FileInfo has been updated and is now able to parse PDF files and extract IOCs such as URLs, hosts, domains, IPs, hashes and many more.The analyzer does also support the last version of the extract-msg library.

FileInfo analyzer: IOC Parser long report
FileInfo analyzer: IOC Parser short report

VirusTotal and Python3

The VirusTotal analyzer, including all its flavours, now uses Python3 and an updated virustotal-api library.

Yeti API key

An optional API key can now be configured and used by the Yeti analyzer.

Malwares_GetReport

A hash computation has been fixed in this analyzer.

EMLParser

A first fix has been introduced to avoid this analyzer to crash when there is no content-description in content_header, and a second has been added to correct a header display issue.

IBM XForce Lookup

The analyzer has been improved to allow users to add a trailing / at the end of the API URL without breaking everything.

Updating your Analyzers in Cortex 2.x

Each analyzer and responder comes with its own, pip compatible requirements.txt file. Run the following commands to update your Cortex analyzers to the latest version:

cd path/to/Cortex-Analyzers
git pull
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip2 install -U -r $I || true; done && \
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

for I in responders/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

Once done, do not forget to login to Cortex as an orgadmin and click on the Refresh Analyzers button. Refer to the online Cortex documentation for further details.

Dockerised Analyzers

Cortex 3.x gives you the opportunity to run dockerised analyzers and responders. This means that you no longer have to download all the git repository of Cortex-Analyzers and run lengthy commands to update your analyzers and responders.

If you want to use dockerised analyzers and responders, ensure that the URL of the catalog.json file corresponding to the Cortex-Analyzers repository is registered in application.conf. Please note that this won’t work if you are tracking the stable catalog.

After doing so, do not forget to login to Cortex as an orgadmin, click on the Refresh Analyzers button, then Disable and Enable again each analyzer and responder. Analyzer (and responder) updates should occur automatically as long as docker.autoUpdate is set to true in application.conf (this is the default setting).

Update TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, you must import the new report templates in your instance as follows:

  • download the updated package
  • log in TheHive using an administrator account
  • go to Admin > Report templates menu
  • click on Import templates button and select the downloaded package

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

On Spring, Bees and Cortex-Analyzers 1.16.0

Spring is here and your favorite bees are busy buzzing flowers to prepare you the most palatable honey ever. In the meantime, we are pleased to announce the immediate availability of Cortex-Analyzers 1.16.0, which adds a new responder and three new analyzers to complete an already hefty collection, bringing the total to 117 analyzers and 3 responders!

Release Overview

One responder has been added:

  • FalconCustomIOC, contributed by Michael (#421). We don’t know the last name of Michael. That could be Jordan. Who knows?

Three analyzers have been added:

We could not duly test some of these additions due to lack of access to the associated services or to our legendary laziness. So we would really appreciate it if you could test them and let us know whether they work or not.

FalconCustomIOC

The FalconCustomIOC responder let you submit observables from alerts or cases to Crowdstrike Falcon Custom IOC service.

Crowdstrike Falcon is a paid service. An account and an API key are required to configure and run this responder.

AbuseIPDB

AbuseIPDB analyzer let you determine wether an IP has been reported as malicious or not to the AbuseIPDB web service.

An account and an API key is needed to configure and use this analyzer.

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

AbuseIPDB: short report
AbuseIPDB: long report

BackscatterIO

The BackscatterIO analyzer lets you query the Backscatter.io service for IPs, networks or autonomous systems (AS). It comes in two flavors:

  • BackscatterIO_GetObservations: determine whether an observables has a known scanning activity
  • BackscatterIO_Enrichment: enrich your observables with additional information

TheHive displays this analyzer results as follow:

Backscatter.io:short report
Backscatter.io GetObservations: long report
Bascatter.io GetObservations: long report

SoltraEdge

SoltraEdge analyzer lets you query any observable against theSoltra Edge platform.

To configure and use this analyzer, an account, a token key and the base URL of a SoltraEdge server are needed.

TheHive displays this analyzers result as follow:

SoltraEdge: short report
SoltraEdge: long report

Get It While Supply Lasts!

Each analyzer and responder comes with its own, pip compatible requirements.txt file. To update your Cortex analyzers to 1.16.0, run the following commands:

cd path/to/Cortex-Analyzers
git pull
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip2 install -U -r $I || true; done && \
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

for I in responders/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

Once done, do not forget to login to Cortex as an orgadmin and click on the Refresh Analyzers button. Refer to the online Cortex documentation for further details.

Update TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, you must import the new report templates in your instance as follows:

  • download the updated package
  • log in TheHive using an administrator account
  • go to Admin > Report templates menu
  • click on Import templates button and select the downloaded package

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

The Dockerization Will not be Televised

Do you know what the following set of commands achieve?

$ cd /opt/Cortex-Analyzers
$ sudo git pull
$ for I in $(find /opt/Cortex-Analyzers -name 'requirements.txt'); do sudo -H pip2 install -U -r $I; done \
&& for I in $(find /opt/Cortex-Analyzers -name 'requirements.txt'); do sudo -H pip3 install -U \
-r $I || true; done

The answer is obvious Doctor Watson, right? These highly readable commands (pun intended) allow you to update your Cortex analyzers and responders to the latest stable versions, downloading new ones in the process, going over all the Python 2 and Python 3 dependencies to install the missing ones and upgrade the old ones to make sure they work correctly. These operations take quite a long time and cause some headaches in the process (Hello, I have Python 3.X and this dependency is no longer required, or Hi, I have an old version of Python 2 and it seems I need this other dependency).

And if you are lucky enough to get it running smoothly, you are still not done as you need to log in to the Cortex UI as an organisation administrator (unlike TheHive, Cortex supports multi-tenancy), click on the Refresh analyzers button under Organization > Analyzers then go to Organization > Responders and click on Refresh responders.

So while the answer to the opening question might be simple, updating analyzers and responders is far from being straightforward, to say the least, even if we forget the ugly fact that both are stored in a repository “conveniently” named Cortex-Analyzers*:

thehive@thehive-training:/opt/Cortex-Analyzers$ ls -d a* r*
analyzers  responders

Unnecessary Complexity Must Die

Your lovely, hard-working bees hate unnecessary complexity. Our project’s front page blatantly states our mission to bring Security Incident Response to the masses. And we have to stand by our words even if TheHive and Cortex are free, open source solutions and we do not gain anything from them save for the huge satisfaction of helping our fellow incident handlers level the fight against cybercriminals & all kinds of other animals of the APT (Advanced Persistent Troll Threat) bestiary.

There is only one possible solution: simplify the installation and update process of the current, official 115 analyzers and responders we have as of this writing, the future ones and any private or unofficial ones written in other programming languages such as those developed in Go by Rosetelecom-CERT.

Docker all the Things!

Starting from Cortex 3.0, the next major release of your favourite analysis and active response engine, all analyzers and responders will be dockerized. It will no longer be necessary to install them along with their various dependencies. They will be dowloaded from our cortexengine Docker organisation. Sysadmins might also configure automatic updates.

As a side advantage of using Docker, analyzers, and responders will also be isolated from each other which gives more flexibility and possibilities.

© Steve Simson. This artwork and the title of this blog post are inspired by The Revolution will not be televised, a song from the late and great Gil Scott-Heron.

For those users who have private, custom analyzers and responders that they don’t want or can’t share with the community, several options will be available:

  • Continue managing their analyzers and responders in the same way as currently supported by Cortex 2 (i.e. launch them as processes, with no isolation whatsoever).
  • Dockerize them and store them locally on their Cortex instance.
  • Dockerize them and publish them on a Docker registry, either the official one or a private registry.

A Docker image of Cortex 3 will still be provided. It will contain a Docker engine to launch dockerized analyzers and responders using DIND (Docker in Docker).

It won’t be necessary to modify the code of the current, official analyzers and responders. A drone job will monitor the analyzer and responder repository and automatically build docker images when it detects changes.

The Cortex Web interface will be slightly modified to accommodate the whole process and allow adding in-house/private Certificate Authorities to allow Cortex to smoothly perform updates in those corporate environments where TLS/SSL inspection is enabled.

Nice Movie Trailer. When is it Coming to a Theatre near me?

We are working hard to get Cortex 3 out of the oven in Q1 (of this year, yes). We will reach out to you, dear reader, in due time, to help us test it and refine it before putting it on the digital shelf for free, as usual. We will provide a smooth migration path in order to move safely your current analyzers and responders and their configuration to Cortex 3.

So to paraphrase the late and great Gil Scott-Heron:

The dockerization will not be televised

The dockerization will not be televised

The dockerization will be live.

Since you are here

The success of TheHive and Cortex continue to grow, far more than we initially foresaw. As far as we know, there are about a hundred organisations of different sizes and locations using or testing them. And as the number of users grows, so does the number of features, professional service and support requests.

We have tried addressing these requests through Creative Source, a nonprofit organisation (NPO). All but one company trusted us enough to make a donation and get tailored services for its needs in return. Most of the others either did not reply to our proposals or explained that their procurement process does not accommodate working with NPOs.

Some members of our core team are actively working on alternative options to ensure not only the viability of TheHive and Cortex as FOSS products on the long run but the ability to provide professional training, support, and services without freaking out highly bureaucratic, think-in-the-box-but-never-outside procurement departments.

Stay tuned 🐝


(*) When the idea behind Cortex was born into our hive mind, we did not initially think about active response capabilities. So we naturally called the repository which was supposed to contain analyzers Cortex-Analyzers . When, at a later stage, we added responders, we put them in the same repository for obvious laziness pretences  ¯\_(ツ)_/¯.

Correction: February 15, 2019
Typographical errors have been corrected. Some rewording has been made for the sake of clarity.

UnshortenLink, SSRF and Cortex-Analyzers 1.15.2

We urge our fellow fighters of cybercrime and funny and not-so-funny animals-in-disguise, to update their Cortex analyzers to the latest 1.15.2 version which plugs a serious vulnerability in the Unshortenlink analyzer and fixes several bugs.

Unshortenlink Vulnerability

On Jan 24, Alexandre Basquin discovered a SSRF vulnerability in the Unshortenlink 1.0 analyzer. By exploiting it, an attacker which has access to a Cortex instance with an analyze role can scan the ports of localhost and possibly of all the hosts reachable by Cortex. This could be automated through Cortex4py by making repetitive calls to the API and thus scanning multiple ports & hosts. In essence, the attacker can perform reconnaissance thanks to Unshortenlink and gain knowledge on which ports are open and which aren’t.

Version 1.1 of Unshortenlink, included in Cortex-Analyzers 1.15.2, plugs this vulnerability by disabling submissions containing IPs & ports. Only URLs are now accepted.

Bug Fixes

Additionally, Cortex-Analyzers 1.15.2 corrects the following bugs:

  • #416: the Mailer responder now supports UTF-8 encoding.
  • #410: remove wrapping of the results produced by crt.sh as a list which ends up breaking the output of the report template. Contributed by Thomas Kastner.
  • #409: enum is not required for Python 3.4+ to make the MISP Search analyzer work.
  • #408: FileInfo’s Manalyze plugin did not work after Manalyze renamed plugin_btcaddress to plugin_cryptoaddress.
  • #406: fix a broken link in the Cymon_Check_IP report, submitted by Manabu Niseki.
  • #313: fix wrong file handling in OTXQuery.

How to Update your Analyzers?

To update your analyzers to version 1.15.2, please read the Updating section of the Cortex installation guide.

Since the version numbers of few analyzers have changed, you’ll need to connect as an orgadmin to Cortex to refresh the analyzer list, disabling old ones and enabling the new versions.

TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, you must import the new report templates in your instance as follows:

  • download the updated package
  • log in TheHive using an administrator account
  • go to Admin > Report templates menu
  • click on Import templates button and select the downloaded package

Wait a Minute! Where’s the Blog Post about 1.15.1?

Good catch! There was no blog post about Cortex-Analyzers 1.15.1. Call us lazy but there was nothing Earth-shattering, pole-shifting in that release. Nonetheless, here are a list of fixes included in that release and from which you’ll inherit automatically if you update 1.15.0 to 1.15.2 directly:

  • #402: Malwares analyzer code relied on functionality that’s only available in Python 3.7+. It has been fixed to work with 3.4 and up thanks to the work of Arcuri Davide.
  • #404: fixes a bad folder renaming in the HIBP (Have I Been Pwned) analyzer.
  • #398: MISP Search analyzer wouldn’t run without the enum dependency. Contributed by Mars Huang. Later improved in 1.15.2 (see above).

No Luck Luke?

If something does not work as expected, keep calm and ask on our user forum, reach out to fellow users on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org.

New Year, New Analyzers

Dear fellow incident handlers and cybercrime fighters around the world, the galaxy, the known and the unknown universe, first and foremost, all TheHive Project’s team would like to wish a wonderful new year 2019 to you and to your cherished relatives. We truly hope that eagles, pandas, kittens, babars, bears and all sorts of animals will stay out of the way. And remember that you don’t need to go bankrupt by purchasing so-called Next Gen™ magical solutions that work only when there’s a full moon and the page number of the book you are currently reading is 42 to investigate threats 😉

We would like to begin the year by introducing version 1.15.0 of Cortex analyzers, bringing the total number of analyzers to a whopping 113! And thanks to Kyle Parrish, this release improves the Mailer responder to allow you to specify a custom port number for your SMTP server and adds a new one to blacklist observables on Cisco Umbrella utilizing the Enforcement API. The Cisco Umbrella Blacklister responder will then add the tag Umbrella:blockedto the observable.

Cortex-Analyzers 1.15.0 also include fixes and enhancements for Eml_Parser, IBM X-Force, Fortiguard, and Shodan. Most of these modifications were contributed by our continuously growing user community. Thanks to all of those who help us in our mission to provide free and open source security incident response tools to the masses!

Please read the relevant sections in the Cortex installation guide to install or update your analyzers and responders in order to benefit from all this sweet & tasty honey.

New Analyzers

The following analyzers have been added:

Cyberprotect

This analyzer lets you query the Cyberprotect ThreatScore service for domains and IP addresses. No configuration is needed and it can be used out of the box.

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

Have I Been Pwned

The HIBP_Query analyzer lets you check email addresses on Have I Been Pwned. You can use an optional parameter to include unverified breaches in the search results. Otherwise, it can be used without any additional configuration.

When called from TheHive, results would display as such:

PatrOwl

As it name states, The Patrowl_GetReport analyzer will let you get the current PatrOwl report for a FQDN, a domain name or an IP address. You need a running PatrOwl instance or to have access to one to use the analyzer.

If you fire it from TheHive, it would display results as follows:

SecurityTrails

This analyzer comes in two flavors in order to get Whois data and Passive DNS details using SecurityTrails. To use both flavors, you will need an account for the service to retrieve the associated API key, which you need to configure the analyzers.

SecurityTrails_Passive_DNS displays results in TheHive as follows:

The Whois variant produces reports such as:

Cisco Umbrella

In addition to Cisco Umbrella Investigate, you can now query the Umbrella Reporting API for recent DNS queries and their status for a domain name using the new Umbrella_Report analyzer.

New Shodan Flavors

In addition to Shodan_Host and Shodan_Search, which allow you to obtain Shodan information on a host and the search results for a domain name, now you can get domain resolutions (Shodan_DNSResolve), obtain scan history results for an IP address (Shodan_Host_History), get information on a domain (Shodan_InfoDomain) and the reverse DNS resolutions for an IP address (Shodan_ReverseDNS).

DomainTools

The following DomainTools flavors were added to this release:

  • DomainTools_HostingHistory: get a list of historical registrant, name servers and IP addresses for a domain.
  • DomainTools_ReverseIPWhois: get a list of IP addresses which share the same registrant information. It applies to a mail, IP, or domain.

Moreover, please note that DomainTools_WhoisLookup now handles IP addresses in addition to domains and provides parsed results. DomainTools_WhoisLookup_IP is thus not needed anymore. Instead, DomainTools_WhoisLookupUnparsed has been added to do the same as DomainTools_WhoisLookup, except that the output results are unparsed.

Cortex 101: Dissecting Observables a Hundred Ways

TheHive Project’s Code Chefs are glad to announce that, thanks to the precious contributions of the user community, Cortex has broken the one hundred analyzer mark.

Cortex-Analyzers version 1.14.0 is out and includes new analyzers, some improvements and some bug fixes.

New Analyzers

New and enhanced analyzers, described below, are:

  • Cisco Investigate by Cisco Umbrella Research @opendns
  • Proofpoint Forensics Lookup by Emmanuel Torquato
  • Proofpoint Threat Insight Forensics Analyzer by Emmanuel Torquato
  • RecordedFuture by jojoob
  • urlscan.io search by ninoseki
  • Google DNS over HTTP by 0xswitch
  • RTF files support in FileInfo by Nils Kuhnert
  • Datascan and Inetnum flavors in Onyphe analyzer by Pierre Baudry and Adrien Barchapt

Again, huge thanks for the awesome work that has been performed by all our contributors!

Investigate

Cisco Umbrella Investigate provides threat intelligence about domains and IP addresses accross the Internet. The analyzer can be used to query the Cisco Umbrella (formerly OpenDNS) API and get information about an IP or a domain name. An API key is required to use this analyzer.

Results are displayed in TheHive in the following manner:

sc-investigate-short

sc-investigate-long
Cisco Investigate: short and long reports

Proofpoint Forensics Lookup

According to Proofpoint’s website, the Forensics API allows insight in detailed forensic evidences about individual threats or compaigns. The analyzer can be used to check observables against given indicators of compromise stored in the ProofPoint service.

Unfortunately, there are currently no sample report screenshots available, because TheHive’s Core Team does not have access to Proofpoint services. Also, due to the same reason, this analyzer could not be tested by us. If you have access to the service and can test the analyzer and/or provide report screenshots, please let us know.

RecordedFuture

This analyzer lets you get the latest risk data from RecordedFuture for a hash, domain or an IP address. It can be used to query the API and get information. An API key is required to use this analyzer.

Results are displayed in TheHive in the following manner:

sc-recordedfuture-short

sc-recordedfuture-long
RecordedFuture: short and long reports

Urlscan.io search

Urlscan.io is a service that scans and analyzes websites. Submitted pages will be browsed like a regular user would do and every activity gets recorded. The analyzer submitted by ninoseki queries urlscan without initiating a scan which would be publicly visible on the website. Accepted datatypes for this analyzer are URL, domain, hash and IP.

The templates which display the results of the analyzer look like the following screenshots:

Screenshot from 2018-10-25 09-55-34

Screenshot from 2018-10-25 09-48-58
Urlscan.io: short and long reports

Google DNS over HTTP

This analyzer provides DNS information for an IP, a domain or a FQDN by making calls to Google DNS-over-HTTP (DoH). No API key is required.

Results are displayed in TheHive in the following manner:sc-googleDNS-short

sc-googleDNS-long
Google DNS: short and long reports

RTF files support in FileInfo

The FileInfo meta analyzer has been improved and now leverages the rtfobj tool provided in the Oletools suite by Decalage.

Results are displayed in TheHive in the following manner:

sc-fileinfo_RTF-short

sc-rtfobj-long
FileInfo with rtfobj: short and long reports

Datascan and Inetnum flavors in Onyphe analyzer

The Onyphe analyzer has been enhanced with two new flavors. Datascan provides information about known open ports on a specific IP, and Inetnum enumerates all known network information about the analyzed IP address.

An API key is required to use the analyzer and can be obtained by creating an account on the Onyphe website.

Results are displayed in TheHive in the following manner:

sc-onyphe-inetnum-short

sc-onyphe_inetnum-long
Onyphe  Inetnum: short and long reports

sc-onyphe_datascan-short

sc-onyphe_datascan-long
Onyphe Datascan: long and short reports

Bug fixes and enhancements

  • #248: Improve error msg when VT Get Report does not have an entry for
  • #323: Fix an issue with HybridAnalysis analyzer filenames handler
  • #329: Enhance PassiveTotal Passive DNS report
  • #348: Fix a typo in URLhaus’s long.html
  • #356 : Force the use of Python3 in MISP analyzer
  • #362: Fix file not found issue and empty result set in CERT.at passive DNS analyzer

Get It While Supply Lasts!

Each analyzer comes with its own, pip compatible requirements.txt file. To update your Cortex analyzers to 1.14.0, run the following commands:

cd path/to/Cortex-Analyzers
git pull
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip2 install -U -r $I || true; done && \
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

Once done, do not forget to login to Cortex as an orgadmin and click on the Refresh Analyzers button. Refer to the online Cortex documentation for further details.

Update TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, get the latest version of  the report templates and import them into TheHive.

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

TheHive4py 1.5.1 Released

When you need to interact with TheHive’s REST API and you ain’t shy of working with Python, TheHive4py is the way to go. It’s a free, open source library we provide to allow you to easily create alert feeders, automate certain tasks like creating cases, assign them to analysts and much more. For example, Synapse, DigitalShadows2TH and Zerofox2TH leverage the library to send alerts to your favourite SIRP/SOAR.

Sometime ago, we decided that it was time to overhaul the whole library and we began working on version 2.0.0 which will be easier to use. It should also support the full set of TheHive’s REST API calls. In the meantime we decided to release version 1.5.0, shortly followed by version 1.5.1 to support some new functionality contributed by our user community and correct a few issues.

code_quality
Source : XKCD

New Features Introduced in 1.5.0

Bugfixes Introduced in 1.5.0

  • #80: Prevent max recursion depth exceeded error, contributed by Psynbiotik

New Features Introduced in 1.5.1

Important note: TheHive4py 1.5.1 does not work with TheHive 3.0.10 or earlier versions. Please stick with 1.5.0 if you are using those versions.

Updating/Installing

To update your existing package:

$ sudo pip install thehive4py --upgrade

If you are just getting started with TheHive4py, you can forgo the --upgrade at the end of the command above.

But I just Wanna Play!

If you’d like to play around with TheHive4py 1.5.1, TheHive 3.1.1., Cortex4py 2.0.1 and Cortex 2.1.1, please download the training VM.

Paris? Are you There?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. As usual, we’ll be more than happy to help!

Correction: October 12, 2018
As reported by Robin Hahling, TheHive 1.5.1 does not work with TheHive 3.0.10 or earlier versions.