DigitalShadows Feeder 2.4.5

DigitalShadows2TH 2.4.5, a new version of the DigitalShadows feeder for TheHive, has been released with major improvements.

Source : https://www.bustle.com

Dockerise All The Things!

The most notable one is that you can now use it with docker. Run docker pull thehiveproject/ds2th and create a homedir for configuration and logs.

$ DS2TH_HOMEDIR = /opt/thehive_feeders/Digitalshadows2TH/
$ docker pull thehiveproject/ds2th:latest
$ mkdir -p $DS2TH_HOMEDIR/{config,log}
$ wget -O $DS2TH_HOMEDIR/config/config.py\
https://raw.githubusercontent.com/TheHive-Project/DigitalShadows2TH/master/config.py.template

Edit the config.py before runing the docker command below:

$ docker run --rm --net=host --mount\
type=bind,source="$DS2TH_HOMEDIR"/config,target=/app/config --mount type=bind,source="$DS2TH_HOMEDIR"/log,target=/app/log certbdf/ds2th <OPTIONS>
Quick Installation

If that sounds still complicated, worry not! We also wrote a little program that helps you prepare the environment and install everything. We ensured that it works well on Ubuntu 18.04. The program uses two environment variables to set up everything: FEEDERS_SYSACCOUNT and FEEDERS_HOMEDIR :

$ export FEEDERS_SYSACCOUNT=thehive
$ export FEEDERS_HOMEDIR=/opt/thehive_feeders

There are also sane, default settings in case you did not set any value. DigitalShadows2TH’s home directory will be set to /opt/thehive_feeders/DigitalShadows2TH. To use the script, run the following command line and follow the instructions:

 $ wget -qO- https://raw.githubusercontent.com/TheHive-Project/DigitalShadows2TH/mater/INSTALL/install_with_docker.sh | sudo -E bash -

Custom Case Templates

Previous versions of DigitalShadows2TH allowed only one case template to be associated with alerts created by the feeder in TheHive. Starting from DigitalShadows2TH 2.4.0, you can define a case template for each type of incidents raised by DigitalShadows in the configuration file.

The configuration pertaining to TheHive looks as follows:

TheHive = {
 'proxies':{
     'http': '',
     'https': ''
},
   'url':'THEHIVE_URL',
   'key':'THEHIVE_API_KEY',
   'templates': {
       'default':''
  }
}

Each incident type in DigitalShadows can be associated with a case template in TheHive, for example:

TheHive = {
  'proxies':{
      'http': '',
      'https': ''
  },
    'url':'THEHIVE_URL',
    'key':'THEHIVE_API_KEY',
    'templates': {
        'default':'MY_DEFAULT_CASE_TEMPLATE_FOR_DIGITALSHADOWS_INCIDENTS',
        'DATA_LEAKAGE': 'MY_DATA_LEAKAGE_CASE_TEMPLATE',
        'CYBER_THREAT': 'MY_CYBER_THREAT_CASE_TEMPLATE'
    }
}

A template can be defined for all the following DigitalShadows incident types:

  • DATA_LEAKAGE
  • CYBER_THREAT
  • PHYSICAL_SECURITY
  • SOCIAL_MEDIA_COMPLIANCE
  • BRAND_PROTECTION
  • INFRASTRUCTURE

A default template can be defined for DigitalShadows incidents. If no template is found for a specific incident type, the feeder looks for the default template. if no default template is found, an empty case will be created by when importing the alert.

Update or Install

If you are not using docker, just pull the repository and update your configuration file with the new templates part for TheHive.

Update your Repository
$ cd /opt/TheHive_feeders/DigitalShadows2TH/
$ git pull

The configuration file has changed, so you need to update yours before running the program. A new templates section has been added for TheHive and the path has changed. It is now in the config/ directory of the project.

Install and Use via the Code Repository
$ cd /opt/TheHive_feeders 
$ git clone https://github.com/TheHive-Project/DigitalShadows2TH.git

After that, follow the prerequisites and edit the configuration file. In /opt/TheHive_feeders/DigitalShadows2TH/config/ copy config.py.template to config.py and modify it.

Use cases and detailed configuration instructions can be found in the README file in the repository.

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

A Short Story of Getting Work Done: TheHive 3.3.0

Some of our die-hard fans noticed that we silently released TheHive 3.3.0 a few days ago, after six release candidates. Well. Silently won’t be the right word to use in this case as we are drowning under work and feature requests and we sometimes postpone communication in favour of getting true real work done.

So, without any further ado, we are happy to announce the official availability of our latest (and of course greatest) release of the most-advanced, next-gen, HI (Human Intelligence), gluten-free, (add here any keyword that you fancy to help us get the Gartner attention and land in the Magic Quadrant™), free and open source Security Incident Response Platform Security Orchestration Automation & Response Platform.

As stated earlier, TheHive 3.3.0 went through the largest number of release candidates to date in order to ensure it contains more features than bugs (or unexpected functionality as our dear Nabil call them sometimes).

Since RC5 which we have blogged about on Feb 26, 2019, below is an outline of the changes we made. Check TheHive Installation Guide for installation instructions.

The new Related Alerts tab in Case View introduced in 3.3.0-RC5

Fixed Issues

  • #899: fix a crashing issue encountered with Firefox
  • #907: dynamic (auto-refresh) of cases was broken in 3.3.0-RC5
  • #930: merging cases by CaseID was broken

Implemented Enhancements

  • #666: add support for filtering tags by prefix and wildcard search
  • #901: remove the possibility of creating cases from scratch (i.e. empty cases) when explicitly disabled by an admin
  • #908: add support for text-based widgets to the dashboards
  • #912: responders can now add tags to alerts when triggered thanks to the new AddTagToAlert operation

Looking for Help?

Something does not work as expected? Then please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org.

Since You are Here

TheHive and Cortex are a huge success. According to our estimates, there are about a hundred organisations of different sizes and locations using or testing them. And as the number of users grows, so does the number of features, professional service and support requests. 

We tried finding a solution to keep TheHive Project as healthy as possible. So we created Creative Source, a nonprofit organisation (NPO), in the hope that we could leverage it to hire more developers thanks to the generous donations of our large user community. Sadly, not everyone in this world is generous and altruistic. At the end, all but one company (yes, exactly one) trusted us enough to make a donation and get tailored services for its needs in return. Most of the others either did not reply to our proposals or explained that their procurement process does not accommodate working with NPOs.

As we informed you a few weeks ago, some members of our core team are finalising an alternative option to ensure not only the viability of TheHive and Cortex as FOSS products on the long run but the ability to provide professional training, support, and services without making highly bureaucratic, think-in-the-box-but-never-outside procurement departments freak out.

Expect to hear from us soon…

On Spring, Bees and Cortex-Analyzers 1.16.0

Spring is here and your favorite bees are busy buzzing flowers to prepare you the most palatable honey ever. In the meantime, we are pleased to announce the immediate availability of Cortex-Analyzers 1.16.0, which adds a new responder and three new analyzers to complete an already hefty collection, bringing the total to 117 analyzers and 3 responders!

Release Overview

One responder has been added:

  • FalconCustomIOC, contributed by Michael (#421). We don’t know the last name of Michael. That could be Jordan. Who knows?

Three analyzers have been added:

We could not duly test some of these additions due to lack of access to the associated services or to our legendary laziness. So we would really appreciate it if you could test them and let us know whether they work or not.

FalconCustomIOC

The FalconCustomIOC responder let you submit observables from alerts or cases to Crowdstrike Falcon Custom IOC service.

Crowdstrike Falcon is a paid service. An account and an API key are required to configure and run this responder.

AbuseIPDB

AbuseIPDB analyzer let you determine wether an IP has been reported as malicious or not to the AbuseIPDB web service.

An account and an API key is needed to configure and use this analyzer.

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

AbuseIPDB: short report
AbuseIPDB: long report

BackscatterIO

The BackscatterIO analyzer lets you query the Backscatter.io service for IPs, networks or autonomous systems (AS). It comes in two flavors:

  • BackscatterIO_GetObservations: determine whether an observables has a known scanning activity
  • BackscatterIO_Enrichment: enrich your observables with additional information

TheHive displays this analyzer results as follow:

Backscatter.io:short report
Backscatter.io GetObservations: long report
Bascatter.io GetObservations: long report

SoltraEdge

SoltraEdge analyzer lets you query any observable against theSoltra Edge platform.

To configure and use this analyzer, an account, a token key and the base URL of a SoltraEdge server are needed.

TheHive displays this analyzers result as follow:

SoltraEdge: short report
SoltraEdge: long report

Get It While Supply Lasts!

Each analyzer and responder comes with its own, pip compatible requirements.txt file. To update your Cortex analyzers to 1.16.0, run the following commands:

cd path/to/Cortex-Analyzers
git pull
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip2 install -U -r $I || true; done && \
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

for I in responders/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

Once done, do not forget to login to Cortex as an orgadmin and click on the Refresh Analyzers button. Refer to the online Cortex documentation for further details.

Update TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, you must import the new report templates in your instance as follows:

  • download the updated package
  • log in TheHive using an administrator account
  • go to Admin > Report templates menu
  • click on Import templates button and select the downloaded package

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

Here comes the Sun (and TheHive 3.3-RC5)

On February 10, 2019, we released TheHive 3.3-RC2. It contained new features such as bulk alert merging, alert sorting, observable tag autocompletion, exporting case tags to MISP & more. Since then your favourite French code Chefs have been beesy refining TheHive 3.3 through new release candidates while getting Cortex 3 ready for prime time.

Over the weekend, Nabil decided he was not working enough already during the week. So he drained his batteries to the very last drop to release TheHive 3.3-RC5 before he crashed headfirst into his bed for a long, reparative sleep. Cumulatively since RC2, we added several features and squashed 10 bugs as described below.

Note that release candidates are beta software. You can get TheHive 3.3-RC5 from the pre-release, beta repositories. As usual, we encourage you to test it and report any bugs or issues you spot so we can address them before the final release. 

Check TheHive Installation guide for further details.

New Features

  • #485: disable clickable widgets when editing a dashboard.
  • #820: provide direct access to MISP events for those alerts that have been generated from such events.
Direct access to the MISP event from which this alert has been generated from
  • #829: improve password-protected ZIP imports.
  • #831: add auto-completion to case and observable tags in their respective Details pages.
  • #838: when you add an observable that already exists in another case, indicate whether the existing observable is an IOC or not.
  • #870: provide a link to copy the alert ID to the clipboard which allows you to easily manipulate an alert through TheHive4py.
Now the Alert ID can be directly copied to the clipboard without resorting to your browser dev mode
  • #884: add a Related Alerts tab to the Case view.
The new Related Alerts tab in Case View
  • #888: add a new UI configuration admin section. One of the first use cases of this section consist in disabling creating empty cases (i.e. cases not associated with a template). It will be gradually improved with new use cases so speak your mind!
  • #893: disable the case template selection when trying to merge multiple alerts for which no case template exists.
  • #897: mouseover text for alert preview.

Fixed Bugs

  • #856: various fixes related to alert updates and, when applicable, associated cases.
  • #869: use the observable TLP instead of the case TLP to decide whether a Cortex responder could be executed or not.
  • #871: fix log messages for MISP synchronisation.
  • #874: fix typo in alert labels (credits: Zachary Priddy).
  • #877: fix Akka version mismatch (credits: Zachary Priddy).
  • #890: the Hide Empty Case button in the new UI admin section was broken.
  • #894: when clicking on a donut or a widget in the dashboards, this should take you to the search page with predefined filters, without generating errors.
  • #895: exclude responder jobs from search results.
  • #896: dashboard clicks are not correctly translated into tag filters.

Looking for Help?

Something does not work as expected? Then please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org.

Cortex 101: Dissecting Observables a Hundred Ways

TheHive Project’s Code Chefs are glad to announce that, thanks to the precious contributions of the user community, Cortex has broken the one hundred analyzer mark.

Cortex-Analyzers version 1.14.0 is out and includes new analyzers, some improvements and some bug fixes.

New Analyzers

New and enhanced analyzers, described below, are:

  • Cisco Investigate by Cisco Umbrella Research @opendns
  • Proofpoint Forensics Lookup by Emmanuel Torquato
  • Proofpoint Threat Insight Forensics Analyzer by Emmanuel Torquato
  • RecordedFuture by jojoob
  • urlscan.io search by ninoseki
  • Google DNS over HTTP by 0xswitch
  • RTF files support in FileInfo by Nils Kuhnert
  • Datascan and Inetnum flavors in Onyphe analyzer by Pierre Baudry and Adrien Barchapt

Again, huge thanks for the awesome work that has been performed by all our contributors!

Investigate

Cisco Umbrella Investigate provides threat intelligence about domains and IP addresses accross the Internet. The analyzer can be used to query the Cisco Umbrella (formerly OpenDNS) API and get information about an IP or a domain name. An API key is required to use this analyzer.

Results are displayed in TheHive in the following manner:

sc-investigate-short

sc-investigate-long
Cisco Investigate: short and long reports

Proofpoint Forensics Lookup

According to Proofpoint’s website, the Forensics API allows insight in detailed forensic evidences about individual threats or compaigns. The analyzer can be used to check observables against given indicators of compromise stored in the ProofPoint service.

Unfortunately, there are currently no sample report screenshots available, because TheHive’s Core Team does not have access to Proofpoint services. Also, due to the same reason, this analyzer could not be tested by us. If you have access to the service and can test the analyzer and/or provide report screenshots, please let us know.

RecordedFuture

This analyzer lets you get the latest risk data from RecordedFuture for a hash, domain or an IP address. It can be used to query the API and get information. An API key is required to use this analyzer.

Results are displayed in TheHive in the following manner:

sc-recordedfuture-short

sc-recordedfuture-long
RecordedFuture: short and long reports

Urlscan.io search

Urlscan.io is a service that scans and analyzes websites. Submitted pages will be browsed like a regular user would do and every activity gets recorded. The analyzer submitted by ninoseki queries urlscan without initiating a scan which would be publicly visible on the website. Accepted datatypes for this analyzer are URL, domain, hash and IP.

The templates which display the results of the analyzer look like the following screenshots:

Screenshot from 2018-10-25 09-55-34

Screenshot from 2018-10-25 09-48-58
Urlscan.io: short and long reports

Google DNS over HTTP

This analyzer provides DNS information for an IP, a domain or a FQDN by making calls to Google DNS-over-HTTP (DoH). No API key is required.

Results are displayed in TheHive in the following manner:sc-googleDNS-short

sc-googleDNS-long
Google DNS: short and long reports

RTF files support in FileInfo

The FileInfo meta analyzer has been improved and now leverages the rtfobj tool provided in the Oletools suite by Decalage.

Results are displayed in TheHive in the following manner:

sc-fileinfo_RTF-short

sc-rtfobj-long
FileInfo with rtfobj: short and long reports

Datascan and Inetnum flavors in Onyphe analyzer

The Onyphe analyzer has been enhanced with two new flavors. Datascan provides information about known open ports on a specific IP, and Inetnum enumerates all known network information about the analyzed IP address.

An API key is required to use the analyzer and can be obtained by creating an account on the Onyphe website.

Results are displayed in TheHive in the following manner:

sc-onyphe-inetnum-short

sc-onyphe_inetnum-long
Onyphe  Inetnum: short and long reports

sc-onyphe_datascan-short

sc-onyphe_datascan-long
Onyphe Datascan: long and short reports

Bug fixes and enhancements

  • #248: Improve error msg when VT Get Report does not have an entry for
  • #323: Fix an issue with HybridAnalysis analyzer filenames handler
  • #329: Enhance PassiveTotal Passive DNS report
  • #348: Fix a typo in URLhaus’s long.html
  • #356 : Force the use of Python3 in MISP analyzer
  • #362: Fix file not found issue and empty result set in CERT.at passive DNS analyzer

Get It While Supply Lasts!

Each analyzer comes with its own, pip compatible requirements.txt file. To update your Cortex analyzers to 1.14.0, run the following commands:

cd path/to/Cortex-Analyzers
git pull
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip2 install -U -r $I || true; done && \
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

Once done, do not forget to login to Cortex as an orgadmin and click on the Refresh Analyzers button. Refer to the online Cortex documentation for further details.

Update TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, get the latest version of  the report templates and import them into TheHive.

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

Cortex 2.1.0: The Response Edition

We released Cortex 2.1.0 as a release candidate back in July 31, 2018 along with TheHive 3.1.0-RC1. By then, the power duo which makes digital forensics, incident response and, to an extent, cyber threat intelligence, better, faster, happier, regular exercising gained the ability to perform active response.

We ate our own dog food for a couple of months. We found bugs. We added enhancements and we listened to the early adopters of these new major versions. And today we are thrilled to announce the availability of the stable release of Cortex 2.1.0 along with TheHive 3.1.0.

Cortex 2.1.0 restores the ability to query the analysis and response engine from MISP for enrichment purposes. A new version of the de facto standard for threat sharing should be released shortly as there are also some API-related issues on its side to make the integration fully working again.

mighty-morphin-power-rangers.jpg
Source : Consequence of Sound

Cortex 2.1.0 also gives you the ability to see the PAP (Permissible Actions Protocol) values for each analyzer as well as any custom cache values you might have configured.

You can check out the full changelog and we highly encourage you to install this new version and let us know what you think of it.

Troubles?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

 

 

Unveiling Synapse

When we’re not busy cooking new features, we go back to the trenches and face incidents like many of our fellow analysts who read our publications and use our tools. To do so, we swap our chef toques for firefighter helmets, not only because such shiny headwear is cool, but mainly because incident response (IR) is, at its very heart, firefighting (minus all the dangerous stuff).

If you think about it, when handling incidents you can see everything from cats in trees (spam) to major fire (APT). Thankfully, there are more cats to bring down than fire to extinguish. That being said, a big herd of cats could be a serious threat to your organization, to your mental health or both.

We tend to forget that incident handlers are humans, not robots. Unlike our metal cyberfriends, we need diversity. We can’t risk insanity like Charlie Chaplin in Modern Times if we can avoid it. Unfortunately IR can be highly repetitive, especially if you only have cats to deal with.

Some could say ‘Nah, this is minor, nothing critical here’ but at some point, an analyst brainwashed by the same tasks again and again will be led to fault. In the worst case scenario, one could see an alert and immediately categorize it as false positive without any further consideration. Because ‘this alert is always a false positive’, until the day it is not…

Automation, a Solution?

Intuitively, we look in the direction of automation in order to minimize what we call ‘zombie’ tasks: highly repetitive and brainless tasks that need to be done. We believe that doing so will allow incident handlers to focus on the analysis and not on the tedious side of IR. Ultimately, we hope it will keep analysts stimulated and in a state of alert. Also, it should reduce time and effort spent on the low-hanging fruits.

One of the most dreary tasks in our opinion is to record the context around an incident.
What is the problem? When did it happen? What’s the origin? Who are the victims? How many are there? Answers to these questions let you have an overview of what is happening and are valuable to correlate incidents. So it is worth taking some minutes to add this information to your case. Sadly, most of the time it will look like a succession of ‘Ctrl+C; Alt+Tab; Ctrl+V’ from your incident source to TheHive. Exactly the kind of tasks we want to forego.

Specifications

Having identified the threat that apathetic analysts pose, the root cause (highly repetitive tasks) and a solution (automate the recording of incident context), the question of the implementation has been raised.

The first challenge to solve is the number of incident sources. Almost everything can trigger an incident: a firewall, an IDS, antivirus, SIEM, users, etc… So the application must be designed to accept several sources and must permit to easily integrate new ones. And instead of having to configure multiple alert feeders to supply alerts to TheHive, we would have only one. To some extent, it can be assimilated to a meta feeder.

And if the application works as intended, we still have a second challenge. Let’s say you, dear reader, and ourselves use the galaxy renowned Stargazer IDS. Maybe you’d like to include the full packet capture in the case but we wouldn’t. Using the same product doesn’t mean using it the same way. So we have a variety of sources and for each source, we have a variety of configurations and workflows. Hence any app we design needs to accept multiple configurations and workflows for any given source.

Finally: the third challenge. We want to make the most out of TheHive. Creating cases, creating alerts, assigning cases, adding logs, adding observables … all those actions are not an option.

Synapse

After several trials and failures, we came up with Synapse. Basically it is a Python 3 app which sits between TheHive and your incident sources:

Screen Shot 2018-07-18 at 09.54.28.png
Synapse Overview

To solve the first and third challenge, we rely on connectors. A connector is a Python object dedicated to interact with a security device. In the picture above, you can see the Exchange Connector and TheHive Connector. To extend the number of sources, you just have to develop the connector that corresponds to your device.

Regarding the second challenge, we rely on workflows. Workflows are python scripts who use connectors to automate repetitive tasks when tracking a case. Not happy with the current workflow? Develop your own using the connectors.

At this point, you probably wonder why there’s an API in the picture above. Well, the API is the link between the user and the workflows. By hitting a specific endpoint of the Synapse’s API, the corresponding workflow will be launched. That way the user can choose what to launch, especially if they are only interested in a particular workflow. Moreover, using an API allows us to listen to TheHive’s real-time stream and initiate some actions like closing a QRadar offense when the related case is solved.

At the moment, Synapse includes the Exchange connector and the associated Ews2Case workflow. The workflow features:

  • Case creation from emails
  • Case assignment
  • Adding email bodies to task logs
  • Adding email replies to the case
  • Adding email attachments as observables

And of course, everything is done to minimize the number of clicks! Check the workflow documentation to understand how it works under the hood.

We’re still working on the QRadar connector and the associated workflows but if you can’t wait, have a look at the work done by the community like pierrebarlet’s script.

Check it Out

As usual, Synapse is an open source and free software released under the AGPL (Affero General Public License).

Synapse has its own repository. Start with the user guide and read about the workflow you want to use as you’ll need to configure it.

Troubles?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!