TheHive 4 is Here, Finally!


We have been speaking about it for almost two years.

We have been making it for more than twelve months.

And the day finally came for TheHive 4, our latest and greatest version, to be unleashed! The Chefs behind TheHive Project’s Code Kitchen are very happy to announce the immediate availability of TheHive 4.0, Release Candidate 1 (or 4.0-RC1 or the cool geeks call it).

Source: Berserk, écranlarge

Please note that a release candidate is not considered stable and must not be used in production. And since we almost rewrote TheHive from the ground up to accommodate all the nifty features outlined in a previous blog post, not to mention a few others we will cover in the upcoming weeks, we strongly recommend to take it for a spin on a test environment and help us uncover and fix bugs so we can release a stable version by April or May 2020.

Hmmm… I’d Rather Wait for a Stable Version

That’s your right but please don’t complain that, once released, the stable version is so buggy that it crashed your entire SOC operation and drove down the valuation of cryptocurrencies.

OK, OK… You Convinced Me. Where Should I Start?

Good! Well first things first. At this time, we produced documentation in kind of a rush while minding bazillion other things at the same time. We still need to proof-read it and enhance it.

If you are a seasoned TheHive user/contributor and you know what you are doing, please start with the installation guides for Debian or RedHat like operating systems. Then read the Quick start guide.

Noob warning: if you are completely new to TheHive, please use the latest stable version (3.4). TheHive 4.0-RC1 adds non-negligible complexity to accommodate advanced features such as RBAC and multi-tenancy and we will be very busy taking feedback from the intermediate/advanced users of our platform to make sure the stable version is rock-solid before we can recommend it to beginners.

You can find all the documentation we manage to write (more is coming) in the dedicated TheHive4 area of TheHiveDocs repository:

I’ve Just Tried it and Webhooks are Missing!

Nice catch Eagle Eye! Indeed webhooks have not been integrated in RC1. They will make a reappearance in a future RC, before the stable release. We have integrated them into a new notification system that is almost finished but still needs some elbow grease.

But Are you Going to Maintain TheHive 3.4.x when 4.0 will be Released?

You should know that bees will never let you down unless you gas them with pesticides (i.e. non-constructive feedback) and exigences (don’t forget that this is FOSS and we try to do the best we can, right?). So TheHive 3.4.x is scheduled to be maintained around two years after the release of 4.0 as a stable version, unless Elasticsearch 6.x is EOL’ed before that. In which case, we will have no choice but phase out 3.4.x (moving to ES 7+ will require a lot of work that we can put elsewhere).

Help!!! TheHive 4.0-RC1 Does not Work!

Please open an issue on GitHub using the template made for TheHive4 if you’d like to report a bug on this version. We will monitor those closely and respond accordingly.

Correction: March 3, 2020 
A new section regarding webhooks was added. In addition, a few typos were corrected.

Mum, Docker Docks Don’t Dock Well!

Soon after we released Cortex-Analyzers 2.4.0, Jérôme noticed that something was definitely wrong. And that something was plural.

As he set to retest a few things here and there, he realised that many docker images, for the latest and greatest analyzers and responders, were not automatically built. The code factory wasn’t working 😰

Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/8021817@N07/6262431675

So he started digging. And the more he dug, the more bugs he discovered. Our user community also reported a few issues. He thought it was about time he opens that bottle of Aloxe-Corton, put a Makaya McCraven album to play on his turntable, and rolls his sleeves to address all these problems headfirst 🍷

After a few hours of intense work, he managed to fix the docker build process and release Cortex-Analyzers 2.4.1, a hotfix that corrects the following issues:

  • [#545] Message extraction using FileInfo doesn’t always work
  • [#610] The VirusTotal analyzer contains a typo which prevents it from running
  • [#614] Many analyzers fail to run due to incorrect permissions
  • [#619] Abuse Finder not working with docker after force usage of python3
  • [#620] Missing library prevented the build of the docker image corresponding to the new MalwareClustering analyzer

Finally, he took the opportunity to rename Palo Alto AUTOFOCUS analyzers to Autofocus, for consistency purposes.

Please refer to our previous blog post, pertaining to Cortex-Analyzers 2.4.0, for update instructions.

Thank you in advance for your understanding and happy cyberfighting! 💪🏼

Cortex-Analyzers 2.4.0: 138 Ways to Analyze, 10 Methods to Respond

Guess what? TheHive Project is still alive and well, as Saâd already mentioned in a previous blog post.

We’ve been certainly very busy lately, preparing the upcoming release of TheHive 4 and doing many other things beside working on our FOSS project. As a result, it took us a rather long time to merge several community contributions and reduce the sizeable pile of pull requests.

We would like to thank our contributors for their patience and we hope the cyberdefenders out there will enjoy the brand new Cortex-Analyzers 2.4.0 release, with many new analyzers, responders and some bug fixes & improvements, bringing the total to a whooping 138 analyzers (counting all flavors) and 10 responders!

Additionally, with this release, all analyzers are now using Python 3. No more Python 2 technodebt!

Photo by Saâd Kadhi

What’s New?

New Analyzers

8 new analyzers have been added to this release:

1 analyzer has new flavors:

New Responders

3 new responders have been added:

Overview of the New Analyzers

DomainToolsIris

This analyzer looks up domain names, IP addresses, e-mail addresses, and SSL hashes using the popular DomainTools Iris service API.

The analyzer comes in 2 flavors:

  • DomainToolsIris_Investigate: use DomainTools Iris API to investigate a domain.
  • DomainToolsIris_Pivot: use DomainTools Iris API to pivot on ssl_hash, ip, or email.

A valid DomainTools API integration subscription is needed to run this analyzer.

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

DomainToolsIris short report
DomainToolsIris long report

EmailRep

The EmailRep analyzer checks the reputation of an email address against the emailrep.io database.

IPInfo

This analyzer accesses IP-centric features provided by ipinfo.io. While the EmailRep API can be used without a token for limited usage, the ipinfo.io analyzer requires the configuration of an API token before use.

Maltiverse

This analyzer lets you query the free Maltiverse Threat Intelligence platform for enrichment information about a particular hash, domain, ip or url.

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

Maltiverse short report
Maltiverse long report

MalwareClustering

Andrea Garavaglia contributed this one a long time ago and we finally merged it into the Cortex-Analyzers repository. Andrea gave a talk about the background of this analyzer at the fourth MISP summit. You can watch it here.

In order to use the analyzer, you need to point it to a Neo4j server (you need to supply the host, port, login & password).

PaloAlto Autofocus

This analyzer lets you leverage PaloAlto Autofocus services. Provided you are an Autofocus customer and you have access to their API, you need to configure the analyzer with your username and a token key.

The analyzer comes with 3 flavors:

  • AUTOFOCUS_GetSampleAnalysis lets you request a full report for a given hash.
  • AUTOFOCUS_SearchIOC lets you research for samples linked to specific IoCs with datatypes like domain, fqdn, user-agent, imphash, ip, mutex, tag and url. Please note that mutex and tag are not default datatypes in TheHive. You need to create them in TheHive before you can leverage them.
  • AUTOFOCUS_SearchJSON lets you research for samples based on a complex JSON query.

Important: TheHive has no templates corresponding to this analyzer have been published yet. They will be provided in the near future.

SpamhausDBL

This analyzer performs reputation lookups of a domain or a fqdn against Spamhaus Domain Block List (DBL).

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

SpamhausDBL short report
SpamhausDBL long report

TeamCymruMHR

This analyzer queries Team Cymru’s Malware Hash Registry for known malware hashes (MD5 or SHA-1). If it is malware and known by the service, it returns the last time it has been seen along with an approximate anti-virus detection percentage.

Overview of the New Responders

KnowBe4

This responder allows the integration between TheHive/Cortex and KnowBe4’s User Events API.
If a mail observable is tagged with a specified tag, corresponding to the responder’s configuration (e.g. phished), then the associated user will have a custom event added to their profile in KnowBe4.

A valid account on KnowBe4 and an API key are required to run this responder.

Minemeld

This responder sends observables you select to a Palo Alto Minemeld instance.

To run this responder, a MineMeld Threat Intelligence Sharing account is needed.

Wazuh

This responder performs actions on Wazuh, the open source security monitoring platform. It currently supports ad-hoc firewall blocking of ip observables.

Improvements

New PassiveTotal flavors

Thanks to Brandon Dixon, the PassiveTotal analyzer gains 3 new flavors, bringing the total to 11:

  • PassiveTotal_Trackers let you make tracker lookups on observables of type domain, fqdn and ip.
  • PassiveTotal_Host_Pairs let you make host pair lookups on observables of type domain, fqdn and ip.
  • PassiveTotal_Components lets you make components lookup on observables of type domain, fqdn and ip.

They come with their own report templates.

GreyNoise Analyzer

The analyzer has been updated to support GreyNoise API v2, thanks to the contribution of Whitney Champion (#562).

New Data Types Supported by Some Analyzers

  • VirusTotal_GetReporthas been updated to allow requests for observables of type fqdn.
  • Threatcrowd has been updated to allow requests for observables of type domain.
  • Shodan has been updated to allow requests for observables of type fqdn.

Fixes

  • [#602] The MISP analyzer was bumped to version 2.1 and is ready to use PyMISP 2.4.120.

Get It While Supply Lasts!

I’m Hype

If you are using the dockerized analyzers & responders, ensure to refresh your analyzers and responders in the Cortex WebUI. Connect as an orgadmin and go to the Organization menu. Click on the Analyzers tab and click on the Refresh analyzers button. Do the same for the Responders tab: click on the Refresh responders button.

I’m Country

If you are still using the old-style way of installing analyzers and responders, run the following commands:

cd path/to/Cortex-Analyzers
git pull
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

for I in responders/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

Once done, ensure to refresh your analyzers and responders in the Cortex WebUI. Connect as an orgadmin and go to the Organization menu. Click on the Analyzers tab and click on the Refresh analyzers button. Do the same for the Responders tab: click on the Refresh responders button. Refer to the online Cortex documentation for further details.

Update TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, you must import the new report templates in your instance as follows:

  • download the updated package
  • log in TheHive using an administrator account
  • go to Admin > Report templates menu
  • click on Import templates button and select the downloaded package

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

Under the Mighty Hood of TheHive 4

We have been speaking about it for almost two years. We have been making it for more than twelve months. And the day (or rather the month in this case) has almost come for TheHive 4, our latest and greatest version, to be unleashed.

While the first release candidate should be published by the end of this month, we would like to cover some of the most important changes we introduced in a platform which we rewrote almost from the ground up (40,000 lines of Scala code and counting), while keeping the familiar look&feel our longtime users came to expect.In a previous blog post, we covered TheHiveFS, a nifty feature of TheHive4 that allows you to quickly access all files stored in TheHive directly from your investigation machine. It’s time now to get a look under the hood of THeHive 4.

My Time is Precious. TL;DR Please

A picture is worth a thousand words, right? Here you go then!

The Hive 4’s Brand New Architecture

I am Puzzled, can you Elaborate a Bit?

So, you are not in a hurry anymore? Fine. Here, grab a seat, a glass of Gevrey-Chambertin and tasty Burgundy snails. All set? Let’s start then!

TheHive 4 will be the first version to use a graph database instead of Elasticsearch. Yes, you read that correctly. TheHive 4 won’t support Elasticsearch anymore but fear not fearless cyberdefender. Your friendly bees will not leave you hanging. If you are already using TheHive 3.4.x, we will provide a migration tool that will move your existing data to the new storage system (with no losses or bit flips hopefully).

We haven’t decided to ditch Elasticsearch on a whim or because Thomas (Franco, not Chopitea nor the General) dropped his leftist hipster attitude for a tight, tailor-made dictator uniform straight out of Spain. For all its greatness, ES has some annoying limitations which prevented us from adding, in an elegant, haiku-like way important features such as multi-tenancy, RBAC and large file management, while laying the ground for the future (stop being curious, the future has not been invented yet and when we do invent it, we’ll let you know).

Using JanusGraph, TheHive 4 structures information in graphs and stores them in an Apache Cassandra database. All the files that you attach to task logs or add as observables are stored in a Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS).

Thanks to this brand new architecture, TheHive 4 is horizontally scalable. You can add as many TheHive, Cassandra and HDFS nodes to your Security Incident Response Platform cluster and sustain whatever load you might be facing without a sweat. Who said FOSS can’t be ‘enterprise grade’ (whatever that means in marketing lingo)?

Tour d’Horizon of the Main Features

TheHive 4, boosted by all the passion and skills of Zen Master Franco and MC Adouani, will support, in addition to TheHiveFS:

  • Multi-tenancy
  • RBAC
  • 2FA
  • Web configuration
  • API versioning

We will cover some of these features in greater detail in future instalments. In the meantime, let’s take a ride in a helicopter and view the wonderful landscape laying before us from above. After you Messieurs-Dames, we are French gentlemen and gallantry is of the essence (except when we use the public transportation in Paris, then savages we become).

Multi-Tenancy

As in Cortex, you will be able to create multiple organisations within a single instance of TheHive 4. In addition, an organisation can decide to share a case or parts of it (say a task, some observables, etc.) with other organisations. That way, a peer organisation or a constituent can contribute to the investigation at hand, provide essential information, etc.

RBAC

TheHive 4 supports a large set of user permissions. Some pertain to administrators, others to users and there are also permissions that apply to connectors. For example, users can manage tasks but not observables. They can have the power to share a case or part of it with sister organisations and execute Cortex analyzers but not responders.

You will be able to create roles for users, and, at the organisational level, what we call shares. RBAC deserves its own blog post and we’ll get to it pretty soon.

2FA

Do you really want us to describe this one? Before you answer yes, we’d like to remind you that you are in a helicopter. Just sayin’.

‘They asked me to explain 2FA. So I helped them out of the helicopter. It was flying way above ground.’
Source: Berserk, FNAC.com

Web Configuration

Tired of using vi, Emacs or your favourite CLI editor for making configuration changes to TheHive’s application.conf? Tired of restarting the service to take into account those modifications? Then you will certainly go dance kizomba with Nabil all night long when we tell you that you don’t need to use vi & service (or whatever the kids are using these days) anymore!

Thanks to the new architecture, all the configuration will be stored in the underlying database and you will be able to edit it using the WebUI. TheHive will automatically take the changes into account and you won’t need to restart it.

We can feel your love here. Merci !

API Versioning

TheHive 4 adds API versioning and it will maintain backward compatibility with TheHive 3.4.x without preventing us from adding new features. TheHive4py will not be updated right away for TheHive 4 but thanks to the backward API compatibility, all existing feeders and programs that use the current version of TheHive4py will still work out of the box.

That’s all folks! Stay tuned for further news and, in the meantime, don’t be blue cuz’ the bees gonna take care of you.

Cortex 3.0.1: The ‘Better Logging’ Edition

Lo and behold, we aren’t dead & TheHive Project ain’t toast! So, foremost, Happy New Year folks (we are still in January, right?)! We have some nice gifts coming up for you, gifts that have required very heavy-duty work. Of course, you might complain that we haven’t been responsive as of late but hey, there’s only so much we can do, right?

Happy New Year Folks! (Photo by Saâd Kadhi)

We’ll talk about those gifts in the upcoming weeks. In the meantime, there’s a new Cortex version in town and we urge you to upgrade to it, particularly if you consider deploying several Cortex nodes as a cluster. Indeed, Cortex 3.0.1 fixes a missing dependency that is required to set up such an architecture. Additionally (and this is the part where you should be paying attention), this version fixes the display of error messages pertaining to analyzer and responder operations, and also ensure that old responders and analyzers no longer show up once you clicked on that Refresh button.

Fixes and Enhancements

  • #244 Prevent the Play secret key from being displayed in the logs at startup. Nonetheless, you can still display it (for troubleshooting purposes or to make things easier for attackers that might have access to the logs and be interested in such a world-changing secret) by using the --show-secret option when starting Cortex
  • #243 fixes the display of error messages when analyzers & responders fail
  • #242 Remove references to Google Fonts
  • #238 The Docker image had 4 critical CVEs and 69 high CVEs (*cough*). Contributed by Micheal Hart
  • #239 Missing dependency for cluster bug
  • #234 fixes a bug where old, non-existent analysers were still showing in Cortex after an upgrade. Contributed by daskydasky
  • #241 Analyzer reports no output when it fails
  • #240 An encoding issue causes an invalid format in the catalog file
  • #230 Elastic4play has dropped the ES cluster configuration option. Contributed by Adeel Ahmad
  • #164 Handle second/minute-rates limits on Flavors and Analyzers

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty during the upgrade process, please ask on our user forum, get in touch with the community on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org.

Unleash the Power of Dockerized Analyzers in 5 Minutes

One of the big improvements you’ll notice in Cortex 3 is the support for dockerized analyzers. And amongst some of their benefits, the installation process has been significantly simplified. So let’s assume you do not want to bang your head against Python, or other library dependencies. Then read one for a way to set up analyzers and run them quickly.

The following instructions have been tested on Ubuntu 18.04. If you already have a Cortex instance up and running, you can jump directly to the docker installation section below.

Install System Packages

Prerequisites

  • Ensure your system contains the required packages:
sudo apt-get install apt-transport-https ca-certificates curl software-properties-common
  • Oh, and Cortex should have access to the internet 😉

Cortex

Configure your system to install packages from TheHive-Project repositories.

echo 'deb https://dl.bintray.com/thehive-project/debian-stable any main' | sudo tee -a /etc/apt/sources.list.d/thehive-project.list
sudo apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://pgp.mit.edu --recv-key 562CBC1C

Install Cortex:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install cortex

The Cortex files will be put in /opt/cortex. The Cortex binary will be executed using the cortex account.

The configuration file is /etc/cortex/application.conf.

The Cortex log file is /var/log/cortex/application.log.

Docker

We recommend reading the Docker documentation to install the software.

For Ubuntu 18.04, you can run the following commands:

wget -O- https://download.docker.com/linux/ubuntu/gpg | sudo apt-key add -
add-apt-repository "deb [arch=amd64] https://download.docker.com/linux/ubuntu bionic stable"
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install docker-ce

Use Docker with Cortex

Start by giving the cortex account the permission to run Docker.

usermod -a -G docker cortex

Next, in the Cortex configuration file (/etc/cortex/application.conf) ensure jobs will be executed using Docker:

job {
runner = [docker]
}

Follow the Standard Analyzer Catalog

If you are a complete Cortex noob, please read the Quick Start Guide.

Configure Cortex to get the catalog with up-to-date versions of analyzers. Edit /etc/cortex/application.conf to set the catalog URLs in the analyzer configuration section as shown below:

## ANALYZERS
#
analyzer {
  urls = ["https://dl.bintray.com/thehive-project/cortexneurons/analyzers.json"]
[..]
}

Once Cortex is configured, restart the service with the following command, wait a few seconds and you should be able to connect to Cortex on https://<cortex_host&gt;:9001 et voilà!

sudo service restart cortex

Important Note: The catalog analyzers.json contains information regarding versions of analyzers we consider stable and that are updated with bug fixes. This is typically synchronised with our master branch on Github. When you are using this catalog, you are de facto benefiting from the latest analyzer updates without needing to refresh anything in Cortex or setup again the configuration to get the latest version.

We also provide two additional catalogs:

  • analyzers-stable.json which strictly follows versions of analyzers if you do not want any uncontrolled updates. What does that mean in practice? You will have to click on the Refresh button in Cortex to update your analyzers, disable old ones and enable new versions. Moreover, you will also have to setup again their configuration. Typically, if you installed and setup Cortex with this catalog and the current version of FileInfo analyzers is 6.0, you won’t benefit from the next version, let’s say 6.1, unless you refresh Cortex.
  • analyzers-devel.jsonwhich contains information about new analyzers or version of analyzers that contains code that has been reviewed but not tested enough (or even not tested at all at times) to be deemed ready for production environments. This is typically synchronized with the develop branch of our Github repository.

Same goes for responders. All available catalogs for Cortex are published on bintray so you can choose the one that better fits your needs (or your risk/gambling profile :p).

A Short Story of Getting Work Done: TheHive 3.3.0

Some of our die-hard fans noticed that we silently released TheHive 3.3.0 a few days ago, after six release candidates. Well. Silently won’t be the right word to use in this case as we are drowning under work and feature requests and we sometimes postpone communication in favour of getting true real work done.

So, without any further ado, we are happy to announce the official availability of our latest (and of course greatest) release of the most-advanced, next-gen, HI (Human Intelligence), gluten-free, (add here any keyword that you fancy to help us get the Gartner attention and land in the Magic Quadrant™), free and open source Security Incident Response Platform Security Orchestration Automation & Response Platform.

As stated earlier, TheHive 3.3.0 went through the largest number of release candidates to date in order to ensure it contains more features than bugs (or unexpected functionality as our dear Nabil call them sometimes).

Since RC5 which we have blogged about on Feb 26, 2019, below is an outline of the changes we made. Check TheHive Installation Guide for installation instructions.

The new Related Alerts tab in Case View introduced in 3.3.0-RC5

Fixed Issues

  • #899: fix a crashing issue encountered with Firefox
  • #907: dynamic (auto-refresh) of cases was broken in 3.3.0-RC5
  • #930: merging cases by CaseID was broken

Implemented Enhancements

  • #666: add support for filtering tags by prefix and wildcard search
  • #901: remove the possibility of creating cases from scratch (i.e. empty cases) when explicitly disabled by an admin
  • #908: add support for text-based widgets to the dashboards
  • #912: responders can now add tags to alerts when triggered thanks to the new AddTagToAlert operation

Looking for Help?

Something does not work as expected? Then please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org.

Since You are Here

TheHive and Cortex are a huge success. According to our estimates, there are about a hundred organisations of different sizes and locations using or testing them. And as the number of users grows, so does the number of features, professional service and support requests. 

We tried finding a solution to keep TheHive Project as healthy as possible. So we created Creative Source, a nonprofit organisation (NPO), in the hope that we could leverage it to hire more developers thanks to the generous donations of our large user community. Sadly, not everyone in this world is generous and altruistic. At the end, all but one company (yes, exactly one) trusted us enough to make a donation and get tailored services for its needs in return. Most of the others either did not reply to our proposals or explained that their procurement process does not accommodate working with NPOs.

As we informed you a few weeks ago, some members of our core team are finalising an alternative option to ensure not only the viability of TheHive and Cortex as FOSS products on the long run but the ability to provide professional training, support, and services without making highly bureaucratic, think-in-the-box-but-never-outside procurement departments freak out.

Expect to hear from us soon…