Cortex-Analyzers 2.8.0: to infinity and beyond!

Thanks to the community and all the contributors, this release comes with 1 new Analyzer, 2 new Responders, lots of improvements and bug fixes.

But there is more news from the front.

Starting from this milestone, bugfixes and new Analyzers or Responders should be released in a smoother way as we are improving few processes. Some changes and recommandations should appear in the next days for submission, and our release process will be improved to fix bugs easier and release new code faster.

We also plan to offer a better documentation. We already started to publish information regarding each Analyzer and Responder. This is a work in progress, and it will be updated with the current requirements guide.

DomainToolsIris documentation page

For each Analyzer and Responder, a page details the purpose of each flavors, the configuration required and even some screenshots from report samples. It will also allow developers to share their own notes if wanted.

New Analyzers

New Responders

Improvements

  • Refactor Onyphe using new v2 api (#736)
  • Improvement in Shodan: add vulns in template and taxonomies (#772 & #776)
  • Improvement in Mailer responder: tasks support and auth (#764, #737, #379)
  • Improvement in SinkDb: support for new api with new dataTypes supported (#483, #498, #756)

Analyzers

LastInfoSec

LastInfoSec offers innovative and automated solutions to collect data, refine it and turn it into useful and actionable information, quickly available to improve the protection, detection and investigation capabilities of companies and government organizations.

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

Short template for LastInfoSec Report
Long Template for LastInfoSec Report

Onyphe

An important work has been made on Onyphe Analyzer to support APIv2. All 7 flavors from older version have been removed and merged into only one flavor named “Onyphe_Summary”. An API key is still needed to query Onyphe API.

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

Onyphe_Summary short report
Onyphe_Summary long report

Responders

Sendgrid

Sendgrid is a customer communication platform for transactional and marketing email used when you have to ensure that your notifications and transactional emails are delivered quickly and securely.

This analyzer works like the Mailer one, but relying on SendGrid external service to delivery emails.

In order to use the service please follow the instruction being careful to the verify your email address.

VirusTotalDownloader

This responders runs on Observables of type “hash” and allows analyst to download corresponding file from VirusTotal. Once downloaded, the file is added to the current case observables in TheHive.

In order to use this responder, a Premium API key from VirusTotal is needed. An API key from TheHive is also needed to upload the file in the observables list.

Use the responder on the hash to add the sample in your Observables

Fixes and Improvements

  • Fix: some analyzer uses invalid “email” dataType (#799)
  • Fix in MalwareBazaar: wrong dataTypes in config (#794)
  • Fix in PhishTank: the JSON object must be str, not ‘bytes’ (#786)
  • Fix in VMRay: fix error in parsing and workflow (#785 & #784)
  • Fix in Wazuh: ipaddress import missing (#778)
  • Fix in Minemeld Responder: requests missing in requirements (#774)
  • Fix in WOT: moving to new endpoint (#771)
  • DomainTools Iris: update api urls (#760)
  • Fix in ThreatResponse: module_type key removed from response (#759)
  • Fix in Abuse_Finder: pythonwhois dependency (#742)

Get It While Supply Lasts!

If you are still using the old-style way of installing analyzers and responders, run the following commands:

cd path/to/Cortex-Analyzers
git pull
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done
for I in responders/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

Once done, ensure to refresh your analyzers and responders in the Cortex WebUI. Connect as an orgadmin and go to the Organization menu. Click on the Analyzers tab and click on the Refresh analyzers button. Do the same for the Responders tab: click on the Refresh responders button. Refer to the online Cortex documentation for further details.

Update TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, you must import the new report templates in your instance as follows:

  • download the updated package
  • log in TheHive using an administrator account
  • go to Admin > Report templates` menu
  • click on Import templates button and select the downloaded package

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

Cortex-Analyzers 2.7.0: 5 Analyzers, 1 Responder

Good morning (or evening if you are on that side of the planet) folks!

We had a very busy week, packed with announcements. First, we released TheHive 4.0-RC2 which you’ve certainly taken to test, then we announced two patch releases for TheHive 3.4. And guess what? Here are some additional Cortex analyzers, a responder and a number of fixes and improvements for existing ones, bringing the total to a whopping 146 analyzers and 18 responders!

New Analyzers

New Responders

Analyzers

ANY.RUN

ANY.RUN is a malware sandbox service in the cloud. By using this analyzer, an analyst can submit a suspicious file or URL to the service for analysis and get a report. The report can contain various information such as:

  • Interactive access
  • Research threats by filter in public submissions
  • File and URL dynamic analysis
  • Mitre ATT&CK mapping
  • Detailed malware reports
ANY.RUN short report
ANY.RUN long report

CyberChef

CyberChef is a simple, intuitive web app for carrying out all manner of “cyber” operations within a web browser. These operations include simple encoding like XOR or Base64, more complex encryption like AES, DES and Blowfish, creating binary and hexdumps, compression and decompression of data, calculating hashes and checksums, IPv6 and X.509 parsing, changing character encodings, and much more.

This analyzer connects to a CyberChef-server and comes in 3 flavors:

  • CyberChef_FromBase64, that takes Base64 strings as input for CyberChef-server
  • CyberChef_FromCharCode, that takes CharCode as input for CyberChef-server and run this recipe
  • CyberChef_FromHex, that takes Hex strings as input for CyberChef-server

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

CyberChef short report
image
CyberChef long report

MalwareBazaar

MalwareBazaar is a project from abuse.ch with the goal of sharing malware samples with the infosec community, AV vendors and threat intelligence providers.

This analyzer allows analysts to query the API of this service on observables of types ip, domain, fqdn, url, and hash.

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

MalwareBazaar short report
MalwareBazaar long report

OpenCTI

OpenCTI is an open source platform allowing organisations to manage their Cyber Threat Intelligence knowledge and observables. It has been created in order to structure, store, organise and visualise technical and non-technical information about cyber threats.

This analyzer allows an analyst to query the API and request for information about observables of types domain, ip, url, fqdn, uri_path, user-agent, hash, email, mail, mail_subject, registry, regexp, filename and other.

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

OpenCTI short report
OpenCTI long report

MISPWarningLists reloaded (need for speed aka DB support)

The previous version of this analyzer basically used to clone the MISP Warning lists repository and do a lookup in downloaded files. This can be very long to complete.

This new version introduces the optional support of PostgreSQL:

  • To store warning lists, in a similar way to the NSRL (National Software Reference Library) Analyzer.
  • Make lookups through these lists faster.

If you want to benefit from the performance boost, using a PostgreSQL server to store the data, you can simply install the requirements.txt, feed the database and configure the connection in the configuration as well:

  • First, sync with the misp-warninglists GitHub repository
  • In the analyzer folder, use the program warninglists_create_db.py to import the warning lists in PostgreSQL. Before running, edit the program file and update the path of where your lists are stored (warninglists_path = "misp-warninglists/**/list.json")
  • You can schedule these jobs (ex. with cron): first, sync a folder with the repository, and then run the program to update the database.

Once done, configure the analyzer with the conn parameter to connect to the database, or, if you prefer to continue using the previous behaviour and do your lookups in files, just specify the path of the folder:

MISPWarningList Configuration example

Templates have also been updated, and TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

MISPWarningList short report
MISPWarningList long report

Responders

RT4-CreateTicket

RT4 (Request Tracker) is a ticketing system. With this responder, an analyst can create a ticket in RT. CaseID is submitted to RT as a reference.

Unfortunately, like for some other analyzers and responders, we have not been able to test this responder on our side. Please feel free to share your feedback with us and also with Michael Davis, who we would like to thank for the hard work and for having shared this responder with the community.

Fixes and Improvements

  • Fix Inconsistent Key References in Shodan Analyzer (#748)
  • Fix SSL & python3 for Yeti Analyzer (#468 , #708)
  • Fix bug in Emlparser Analyzer (#730)
  • Fix in Shodan Analyzer: Inconsistent Key References (#748)
  • Support python3 in DNSDB Analyzer (#613)
  • Support APIKey for EmailRep Analyzer (#750)
  • Improvement: EmlParser now extracts some useful IOCs (#710)

Get It While Supply Lasts!

If you are still using the old-style way of installing analyzers and responders, run the following commands:

cd path/to/Cortex-Analyzers
git pull
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done
for I in responders/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

Once done, ensure to refresh your analyzers and responders in the Cortex WebUI. Connect as an orgadmin and go to the Organization menu. Click on the Analyzers tab and click on the Refresh analyzers button. Do the same for the Responders tab: click on the Refresh responders button. Refer to the online Cortex documentation for further details.

Update TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, you must import the new report templates in your instance as follows:

  • download the updated package
  • log in TheHive using an administrator account
  • go to Admin > Report templates` menu
  • click on Import templates button and select the downloaded package

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

Cortex-Analyzers 2.6.0: 146 Analyzers, 18 Responders

Amidst the ongoing COVID-19 crisis, we managed to release Cortex-Analyzers 2.6.0, which includes 4 new Analyzers, 2 new Responders, and a large number of bug fixes and improvements.

We’d like to thank all the contributors for their awesome work!

We truly appreciate the time they generously give away for helping our fellow cyberdefenders out there protect their environments against attackers who are also in lockdown mode. Attackers who, instead of playing board games or chess, are playing with our nerves and the hordes of teleworkers who are willing to click on anything that provide the ‘latest and greatest COVID-19 information’ or which can help them do their jobs (like this wonderful ‘Zoon’ video-conferencing application ūüėč).

Les Temps modernes - Film (1936) - SensCritique
Source: senscritique.com

What’s New?

New Analyzers

New Responders

Analyzers

DomainTools Iris

The Investigate flavour was missing from the DomainToolsIris analyzer that was included in Cortex-Analyzers 2.4.0. This is now fixed. This new flavour can be used to gather interesting information on a domain.

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

DomainToolsIris_Investigate short reports
DomainToolsIris_Investigate long report

IntezerCommunity

Intezer Analyze‚ĄĘ is a cloud-based malware analysis service that provides an extensive understanding of any executable file by comparing code on a massive scale to a comprehensive database of malware and trusted software. 

This analyzer can be used to submit a file to the Intezer service for analysis.

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

IntezerCommunity short report
IntezerCommunity long report

NSRL

The National Software Reference Library (NSRL) is designed to collect software from various sources and incorporate file profiles computed from this software into a Reference Data Set (RDS) of information. The RDS can be used by law enforcement, government, and industry organisations to review files on a computer by matching file profiles in the RDS. This will help alleviate much of the effort involved in determining which files are important as evidence on computers or file systems that have been seized as part of criminal investigations.

In order to use this analyzer, you must download and extract NSRLFile files from the NIST website. You can pick multiple files but you need to rename them in order to understand which file contains the required information.

All files are called NSRLFile.txt, renaming them permit to understand in which file the record has been found.

The analyzer can operate in 2 different ways with 2 completely different performance profiles (we’re speaking around 30 secs vs 0.05 sec):

  1. lookup in plain files
  2. lookup in a database

If you are planning to use this analyzer for many searches, then the second option is suggested and we provide a script to help you parse, validate and insert data in a PostgreSQL database. If you choose this option, consider that the DB size can be around 4 times bigger than plain files.

NSRL Lookup short template
NSRL Lookup long report

UrlScan.io

The URLScan.io analyzer has been updated with a new Scan flavour. Until now, this analyzer allowed to request report regarding a url, domain, fqdn observable. With this new flavour, anyone with a valid API key, which can be obtained for free, can request a scan on observables of the same type.

UrlScan.io short template
UrlScan.io long template

Responders

DomainToolsIris_CheckMaliciousTags

Depending on the reports generated by the DomainToolsIris analyzer, this responder adds a tag at the Case and Observable level if something malicious is found. This responder can be updated to add more custom actions depending on your needs and environment.

DomainToolsIris_AddRiskyDNSTag

Depending on on the reports generated by the DomainToolsIris analyzer, this responder adds a tag at the Case and Observable level if one of the domain observables is considered risky. This responder can be updated to add more custom actions depending on your needs and environment.

Fixes and Improvements

  • Improve TalosReputation analyzer (#521)
  • MISP WarningList analyzer fixed (#538)
  • Error fixed in ThreatCrowd (#518)
  • Encoding related bug fixed in Mailer 1_0 (#573)
  • API has changed: temporary fix for Crt_sh_Transparency_Logs_1_0 (#594)
  • Analyzers missing cortexutils in requirements (#695)
  • New mime types for Office documents in FileInfo (#705)
  • UmbrellaBlacklister analyzer now support fqdn and url observables (#547)
  • URLHaus analyzer support fqdn observables (#556)
  • Abuselpdb now support APIv2 (#618)

Get It While Supply Lasts!

If you are still using the old-style way of installing analyzers and responders, run the following commands:

cd path/to/Cortex-Analyzers
git pull
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done
for I in responders/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

Once done, ensure to refresh your analyzers and responders in the Cortex WebUI. Connect as an orgadmin and go to the Organization menu. Click on the Analyzers tab and click on the Refresh analyzers button. Do the same for the Responders tab: click on the Refresh responders button. Refer to the online Cortex documentation for further details.

Update TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, you must import the new report templates in your instance as follows:

  • download the updated package
  • log in TheHive using an administrator account
  • go to Admin > Report templates` menu
  • click on Import templates button and select the downloaded package

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

Cortex-Analyzers 2.4.0: 138 Ways to Analyze, 10 Methods to Respond

Guess what? TheHive Project is still alive and well, as Sa√Ęd already mentioned in a previous blog post.

We‚Äôve been certainly very busy lately, preparing the upcoming release of TheHive 4 and doing many other things beside working on our FOSS project. As a result, it took us a rather long time to merge several community contributions and reduce the sizeable pile of pull requests.

We would like to thank our contributors for their patience and we hope the cyberdefenders out there will enjoy the brand new Cortex-Analyzers 2.4.0 release, with many new analyzers, responders and some bug fixes & improvements, bringing the total to a whooping 138 analyzers (counting all flavors) and 10 responders!

Additionally, with this release, all analyzers are now using Python 3. No more Python 2 technodebt!

Photo by Sa√Ęd Kadhi

What’s New?

New Analyzers

8 new analyzers have been added to this release:

1 analyzer has new flavors:

New Responders

3 new responders have been added:

Overview of the New Analyzers

DomainToolsIris

This analyzer looks up domain names, IP addresses, e-mail addresses, and SSL hashes using the popular DomainTools Iris service API.

The analyzer comes in 2 flavors:

  • DomainToolsIris_Investigate: use DomainTools Iris API to investigate a domain.
  • DomainToolsIris_Pivot: use DomainTools Iris API to pivot on ssl_hash, ip, or email.

A valid DomainTools API integration subscription is needed to run this analyzer.

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

DomainToolsIris short report
DomainToolsIris long report

EmailRep

The EmailRep analyzer checks the reputation of an email address against the emailrep.io database.

IPInfo

This analyzer accesses IP-centric features provided by ipinfo.io. While the EmailRep API can be used without a token for limited usage, the ipinfo.io analyzer requires the configuration of an API token before use.

Maltiverse

This analyzer lets you query the free Maltiverse Threat Intelligence platform for enrichment information about a particular hash, domain, ip or url.

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

Maltiverse short report
Maltiverse long report

MalwareClustering

Andrea Garavaglia contributed this one a long time ago and we finally merged it into the Cortex-Analyzers repository. Andrea gave a talk about the background of this analyzer at the fourth MISP summit. You can watch it here.

In order to use the analyzer, you need to point it to a Neo4j server (you need to supply the host, port, login & password).

PaloAlto Autofocus

This analyzer lets you leverage PaloAlto Autofocus services. Provided you are an Autofocus customer and you have access to their API, you need to configure the analyzer with your username and a token key.

The analyzer comes with 3 flavors:

  • AUTOFOCUS_GetSampleAnalysis lets you request a full report for a given hash.
  • AUTOFOCUS_SearchIOC lets you research for samples linked to specific IoCs with datatypes like domain, fqdn, user-agent, imphash, ip, mutex, tag and url. Please note that mutex and tag are not default datatypes in TheHive. You need to create them in TheHive before you can leverage them.
  • AUTOFOCUS_SearchJSON lets you research for samples based on a complex JSON query.

Important: TheHive has no templates corresponding to this analyzer have been published yet. They will be provided in the near future.

SpamhausDBL

This analyzer performs reputation lookups of a domain or a fqdn against Spamhaus Domain Block List (DBL).

TheHive displays the analyzer results as follows:

SpamhausDBL short report
SpamhausDBL long report

TeamCymruMHR

This analyzer queries Team Cymru’s Malware Hash Registry for known malware hashes (MD5 or SHA-1). If it is malware and known by the service, it returns the last time it has been seen along with an approximate anti-virus detection percentage.

Overview of the New Responders

KnowBe4

This responder allows the integration between TheHive/Cortex and KnowBe4’s User Events API.
If a mail observable is tagged with a specified tag, corresponding to the responder’s configuration (e.g. phished), then the associated user will have a custom event added to their profile in KnowBe4.

A valid account on KnowBe4 and an API key are required to run this responder.

Minemeld

This responder sends observables you select to a Palo Alto Minemeld instance.

To run this responder, a MineMeld Threat Intelligence Sharing account is needed.

Wazuh

This responder performs actions on Wazuh, the open source security monitoring platform. It currently supports ad-hoc firewall blocking of ip observables.

Improvements

New PassiveTotal flavors

Thanks to Brandon Dixon, the PassiveTotal analyzer gains 3 new flavors, bringing the total to 11:

  • PassiveTotal_Trackers let you make tracker lookups on observables of type domain, fqdn and ip.
  • PassiveTotal_Host_Pairs let you make host pair lookups on observables of type domain, fqdn and ip.
  • PassiveTotal_Components lets you make components lookup on observables of type domain, fqdn and ip.

They come with their own report templates.

GreyNoise Analyzer

The analyzer has been updated to support GreyNoise API v2, thanks to the contribution of Whitney Champion (#562).

New Data Types Supported by Some Analyzers

  • VirusTotal_GetReporthas been updated to allow requests for observables of type fqdn.
  • Threatcrowd has been updated to allow requests for observables of type domain.
  • Shodan has been updated to allow requests for observables of type fqdn.

Fixes

  • [#602] The MISP analyzer was bumped to version 2.1 and is ready to use PyMISP 2.4.120.

Get It While Supply Lasts!

I’m Hype

If you are using the dockerized analyzers & responders, ensure to refresh your analyzers and responders in the Cortex WebUI. Connect as an orgadmin and go to the Organization menu. Click on the Analyzers tab and click on the Refresh analyzers button. Do the same for the Responders tab: click on the Refresh responders button.

I’m Country

If you are still using the old-style way of installing analyzers and responders, run the following commands:

cd path/to/Cortex-Analyzers
git pull
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

for I in responders/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -U -r $I || true; done

Once done, ensure to refresh your analyzers and responders in the Cortex WebUI. Connect as an orgadmin and go to the Organization menu. Click on the Analyzers tab and click on the Refresh analyzers button. Do the same for the Responders tab: click on the Refresh responders button. Refer to the online Cortex documentation for further details.

Update TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, you must import the new report templates in your instance as follows:

  • download the updated package
  • log in TheHive using an administrator account
  • go to Admin > Report templates menu
  • click on Import templates button and select the downloaded package

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

TheHive 3.3-RC2, Hot out of the Oven

TheHive Project’s code Chefs, dressed in their outright haute cuisine outfit, including the traditional toque blanche, have been quite busy lately, working on dockerizing all the Cortex analyzers (more on this later in an upcoming post), and doing tedious work to prepare the replacement of Elasticsearch by a GraphDB which will help us finally release much-awaited features such as multi-tenancy, delayed for way too many months (yeah, yeah, don’t chastise them but feel free to help them). In the meantime, they found enough bandwidth to release a new major version of TheHive.

Version 3.3, currently a release candidate includes several bug fixes and many new features as outlined below. Please note that TheHive 3.3-RC2 is beta software. As all our other release candidates, you can grab it from the pre-release, beta repositories. As usual, we would truly appreciate your help making it a great stable release by testing it as thoroughly as possible and reporting back any bugs or issues you encounter so we can address them before the final release.

Check TheHive Installation guide for further details.

Wait! Where’s RC1?

TheHive 3.3-RC1 was very short-lived. Few hours after its release, and thanks to Chris (a.k.a. crackytsi on GitHub), Thomas Franco, our back-end mastermind, discovered an issue with the Debian 8 and Debian 9 packages.

New Features

  • #836: add a new exportCaseTags parameter to the MISP configuration section. If set to true, all the tags associated with a case will be exported along with it to MISP.
  • #861: add support for Java higher than 8, such as OpenJDK 11.
  • #271: bulk merge alerts into a case. Select multiple alerts at once and create a single case out of them or merge them into an existing case using its ID.
  • #824: add ability to sort alerts by reference, status, type, source…
  • #826: when previewing an alert, there are sometimes no overlap with an existing case. However, an analyst might already know, thanks to HI (Human Intelligence), that the alert should be merged into a specific case. This is now possible thanks to a new button.
  • #769: improve case template selection for case creation. If you have defined a large set of case templates, you will be able to sort/filter to find the case you want to use when creating a New Case.
New case template selector
  • #657: add observable tags auto-completion. Contributed by Tyler Chong (Thanks!).
Observable tag auto-completion

Fixed Bugs

  • #864: do not return a session cookie when making an API call.
  • #856: there was a bug where after a followed alert PATCH, if the alert has already been promoted to a case, the case is not updated. Now, if the alert has follow=true, if it gets updated, its status is set to Updated and the related case is updated too.
  • #845: assigned but unstarted tasks were not showing up in My Tasks.
  • #844: enable user account locking through the Delete API endpoint.

Stuck?

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? No worries, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

TheHive4py 1.5.1 Released

When you need to interact with TheHive’s REST API and you ain’t shy of working with Python, TheHive4py is the way to go. It’s a free, open source library we provide to allow you to easily create alert feeders, automate certain tasks like creating cases, assign them to analysts and much more. For example, Synapse, DigitalShadows2TH and Zerofox2TH leverage the library to send alerts to your favourite SIRP/SOAR.

Sometime ago, we decided that it was time to overhaul the whole library and we began working on version 2.0.0 which will be easier to use. It should also support the full set of TheHive’s REST API calls. In the meantime we decided to release version 1.5.0, shortly followed by version 1.5.1 to support some new functionality contributed by our user community and correct a few issues.

code_quality
Source : XKCD

New Features Introduced in 1.5.0

Bugfixes Introduced in 1.5.0

  • #80: Prevent max recursion depth exceeded error, contributed by Psynbiotik

New Features Introduced in 1.5.1

Important note: TheHive4py 1.5.1 does not work with TheHive 3.0.10 or earlier versions. Please stick with 1.5.0 if you are using those versions.

Updating/Installing

To update your existing package:

$ sudo pip install thehive4py --upgrade

If you are just getting started with TheHive4py, you can forgo the --upgrade at the end of the command above.

But I just Wanna Play!

If you’d like to play around with TheHive4py 1.5.1, TheHive 3.1.1., Cortex4py 2.0.1 and Cortex 2.1.1, please download the training VM.

Paris? Are you There?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. As usual, we’ll be more than happy to help!

Correction: October 12, 2018
As reported by Robin Hahling, TheHive 1.5.1 does not work with TheHive 3.0.10 or earlier versions.

Unveiling Synapse

When we’re not busy cooking new features, we go back to the trenches and face incidents like many of our fellow analysts who read our publications and use our tools. To do so, we swap our chef toques for firefighter helmets, not only because such shiny headwear is cool, but mainly because incident response (IR) is, at its very heart, firefighting (minus all the dangerous stuff).

If you think about it, when handling incidents you can see everything from cats in trees (spam) to major fire (APT). Thankfully, there are more cats to bring down than fire to extinguish. That being said, a big herd of cats could be a serious threat to your organization, to your mental health or both.

We tend to forget that incident handlers are humans, not robots. Unlike our metal cyberfriends, we need diversity. We can’t risk insanity like Charlie Chaplin in Modern Times if we can avoid it. Unfortunately IR can be highly repetitive, especially if you only have cats to deal with.

Some could say ‚ÄėNah, this is minor, nothing critical here‚Äô but at some point, an analyst brainwashed by the same tasks again and again will be led to fault. In the worst case scenario, one could see an alert and immediately categorize it as false positive without any further consideration. Because ‚Äėthis alert is always a false positive‚Äô, until the day it is not‚Ķ

Automation, a Solution?

Intuitively, we look in the direction of automation in order to minimize what we call ‚Äėzombie‚Äô tasks: highly repetitive and brainless tasks that need to be done.¬†We believe that doing so will allow incident handlers to focus on the analysis and not on the tedious side of IR. Ultimately, we hope it will keep analysts stimulated and in a state of alert. Also, it should reduce time and effort spent on the low-hanging fruits.

One of the most dreary tasks in our opinion is to record the context around an incident.
What is the problem? When did it happen? What‚Äôs the origin? Who are the victims? How many are there?¬†Answers to these questions let you have an overview of what is happening and are valuable to correlate incidents.¬†So it is worth taking some minutes to add this information to your case.¬†Sadly, most of the time it will look like a succession of ‚ÄėCtrl+C; Alt+Tab; Ctrl+V‚Äô from your incident source to TheHive.¬†Exactly the kind of tasks we want to forego.

Specifications

Having identified the threat that apathetic analysts pose, the root cause (highly repetitive tasks) and a solution (automate the recording of incident context), the question of the implementation has been raised.

The first challenge to solve is the number of incident sources.¬†Almost everything can trigger an incident: a firewall, an IDS, antivirus, SIEM, users, etc… So the application must be designed to accept several sources and must permit to easily integrate new ones. And instead of having to configure multiple alert feeders to supply alerts to TheHive, we would have only one. To some extent, it can be assimilated to a meta feeder.

And if the application works as intended, we still have a second challenge. Let’s say you, dear reader, and ourselves use the galaxy renowned Stargazer IDS. Maybe you’d like to include the full packet capture in the case but we wouldn’t. Using the same product doesn’t mean using it the same way. So we have a variety of sources and for each source, we have a variety of configurations and workflows. Hence any app we design needs to accept multiple configurations and workflows for any given source.

Finally: the third challenge. We want to make the most out of TheHive. Creating cases, creating alerts, assigning cases, adding logs, adding observables … all those actions are not an option.

Synapse

After several trials and failures, we came up with Synapse. Basically it is a Python 3 app which sits between TheHive and your incident sources:

Screen Shot 2018-07-18 at 09.54.28.png
Synapse Overview

To solve the first and third challenge, we rely on connectors. A connector is a Python object dedicated to interact with a security device. In the picture above, you can see the Exchange Connector and TheHive Connector. To extend the number of sources, you just have to develop the connector that corresponds to your device.

Regarding the second challenge, we rely on workflows. Workflows are python scripts who use connectors to automate repetitive tasks when tracking a case. Not happy with the current workflow? Develop your own using the connectors.

At this point, you probably wonder why there’s an API in the picture above. Well, the API is the link between the user and the workflows. By hitting a specific endpoint of the Synapse’s API, the corresponding workflow will be launched. That way the user can choose what to launch, especially if they are only interested in a particular workflow. Moreover, using an API allows us to listen to TheHive’s real-time stream and initiate some actions like closing a QRadar offense when the related case is solved.

At the moment, Synapse includes the Exchange connector and the associated Ews2Case workflow. The workflow features:

  • Case creation from emails
  • Case assignment
  • Adding email bodies to task logs
  • Adding email replies to the case
  • Adding email attachments as observables

And of course, everything is done to minimize the number of clicks! Check the workflow documentation to understand how it works under the hood.

We’re still working on the QRadar connector and the associated workflows but if you can’t wait, have a look at the work done by the community like pierrebarlet’s script.

Check it Out

As usual, Synapse is an open source and free software released under the AGPL (Affero General Public License).

Synapse has its own repository. Start with the user guide and read about the workflow you want to use as you’ll need to configure it.

Troubles?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

Cerana 0.9 and Cortex 2.0.4 are Out!

We are proud to announce the immediate availability of Cerana 0.9 (TheHive 3.0.9) and Cortex 2.0.4. These hotfix releases address a number of issues and we encourage you to update your current installation at your earliest opportunity. For your comfort and sanity. Seriously.

We also took this opportunity to update Cortex analyzers to fix issues with¬†CIRCL Passive SSL, Hybrid Analysis, and the Joe Sandbox URL Analysis template. Moreover, we have updated the cortexutils library to set the taxonomy level to info if it is invalid. To upgrade¬†cortexutils‚Äč to 1.2.4:

sudo pip install -U cortexutils && sudo pip3 install -U cortexutils

To update your Cortex analyzers:

cd /path/to/Cortex-analyzers && git pull

Note: the Bluecoat analyzer was removed since it does not comply with the updated Terms of Service of Symantec Web Pulse SiteReview. Symantec does no longer permit programmatic querying of the service.

Fixes in Cerana 0.9

  • #527: display long reports when the analyst clicks on the corresponding short reports. Meh!
  • #541: make the drop-down menu for case templates scroll when there is a truckload of them.
  • #452: prevent WSAPI failure.
  • #531: fix naming inconsistencies in the Live Stream.
  • #530: correct an error when trying to analyze a filename using the Hybrid Analysis analyzer.
  • #543: generate an error if unable to contact Cortex.
  • #518: merge observable sightings when merging cases.
  • #535: fix the tag color of the PhishTank analyzer which was transparent under certain conditions.

Fixes in Cortex 2.0.4

  • #89: let a read,analyze¬†user change or display their API key.
  • #91: sort analyzers by name.
  • #92: redirect users to the index page when they click on the Cortex logo.
  • #93: under the¬†Organization > Configurations¬†page, the UI displays wrong green checkmarks for empty configurations.
  • #94: orgadmin¬†users¬†are not able to update their organization‚Äôs users after the users are created. The UI doesn‚Äôt display any error message.
  • #95: avoid ‚Äėlax programming‚Äô, Nabil styleūüėú, and strictly filter the list of analyzers in the Run dialog.
  • #90: fix Python dependency errors in docker.

Support

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? Spotted new bugs? No worries, please open issues on GitHub or comment on existing ones, join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

Correction: April 14, 2018
An earlier version of this post did not mention that the Bluecoat analyzer was removed in the latest Cortex Analyzers repository release.

Cortex 2.0.3 Released and Analyzer Updates

There’s a new version of your ultimate observable analysis engine in town : Cortex 2.0.3 is out!

Cortex 2.0.3 contains a few important enhancements over its predecessor and fixes a number bugs as described in the full changelog summarised below. So get it while it’s still hot out of the digital oven and let us know how tasty it is.

analyzeallthethings
Source : Quickmeme.com

Implemented Enhancements

  • #81: reflect proxy changes in the global configuration at the analyzer level
  • #82: display invalid analyzers and let orgadmins delete them
  • #85: allow orgadmins to override the default global report¬†cache.job¬†period per analyzer through the Web UI
  • #86: allow a job to run with arbitrary parameters

Fixed Bugs

  • #75: a version upgrade of an analyzer makes all analyzers invisible in TheHive
  • #80: fix the analyzer configuration dialog to allow orgadmins to override the auto artifact extraction at the analyzer level
  • #83: hit Nabil on the head pretty hard until the analyzer refresh UI button works (well now it does so you can stop hitting poor Nabil’s head).

Analyzer Updates

We took the opportunity of a new release to make a few updates to the public analyzers. Cortex-Analyzers 1.9.3 contains the following changes:

  • Remove the Bluecoat analyzer to comply with the new ‘no scrapping’ ToS imposed by Symantec
  • Fix the default configuration of the Cymon Check IP analyzer
  • Fix the View all¬†VT long template
  • Make the MISP Warning Lists Analyzer ignore case sensitivity when searching for hashes
  • Restrict the Abuse Finder and FileInfo analyzer dependencies to Python 2.7

You can read the full changelog if you like but if you want to enjoy the goods right away, git pull is your friend.

Support

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? Spotted new bugs? No worries, please open issues on GitHub or comment on existing ones, join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

 

Unveiling Cortex 2

TheHive Project’s Master Chefs are extremely happy to share, for free their latest recipe with the Cyber Threat Intelligence, Digital Forensics and Incident Response communities: Cortex 2.

As its predecessor, Cortex 2 is published under an AGPL v3 license and it introduces many important features that we brushed upon in a Dec 2017 post.

Screen Shot 2017-12-15 at 17.16.06
Cortex 2 — Architecture

Update: Cortex 2.0.1 was released since this post went live. It corrects a few bugs we uncovered in 2.0.0 as described in the changelog. Please install Cortex 2.0.1 instead of 2.0.0.

Authentication

Cortex 2 supports all the authentication methods that TheHive supports: LDAP, Active Directory, local accounts, API Keys, and X.509 SSO.

To connect your favorite Security Incident Response Platform with Cortex 2, you will need to update TheHive to Cerana 0.7 (TheHive 3.0.7) which was released today as well. This version fixes a regression pertaining to case templates introduced by Cerana 0.6 and is the first version to fully support Cortex 2’s API changes and authentication.

To make TheHive 3.0.7 analyze observables at scale through Cortex 2, you have to create an account on Cortex 2 with the read¬†and analyze¬†roles (see the next section) and generate the associated API Key. Next, feed the key in TheHive’s /etc/thehive/application.conf¬†as described in the documentation et voil√† !

TheHive 3.0.7 remains compatible with Cortex 1 and you can connect it to a mixed set of Cortex 1 and/or Cortex 2 instances with no issues.

Organizations, Analyzers and Rate Limiting

Cortex 2 introduces multi-tenancy through organizations and each organization can have its own set of users, with different roles, its own set of analyzers and, if necessary, rate limits that will prevent analysts from burning quotas.

Multi-tenancy has several interesting use cases. For instance, if you are the CSIRT or CERT of a large multinational organization with several regional teams, you can create an organization for each region within your constituency and enable the analyzers that they may need to use. Let’s assume that you bought a VirusTotal subscription that limits you to 5000 requests per month. You can configure the corresponding analyzers to give each region a fair share of that quota and keeping some requests for your own use.

In case you are a commercial CSIRT or an MSSP, you could do the same for your customers by installing only one Cortex 2 instance and creating an organization for each customer.

Screen Shot 2018-03-29 at 16.27.05.png
Configure an analyzer graphically and impose rate limits if necessary

User Roles

By default, Cortex 2 is shipped with the default cortex organization which sole purpose is to create other ones and manage the users within each organization and their associated powers. The cortex organization hosts all users with the superAdmin role and it cannot be used to configure or run analyzers.

As described in the new Quick Start Guide, after installing Cortex 2, updating its database and creating the first user who will have super admin powers, you’ll have to create your first organization and at least one user within that organization with orgAdmin¬†rights.

Screen Shot 2018-03-29 at 16.33.02
Create an organization

You can then log out and log in using the orgAdmin account to create further users within that organization, enable and configure analyzers etc. Please note that no analyzer is enabled by default and you need at least v 1.9.0 of the cortex-analyzers repository. To update your set of analyzers to 1.9.0, please run git pull.

Screen Shot 2018-03-29 at 16.28.47
Manage users within an organization

Besides the superAdmin and orgAdmin roles, Cortex 2 introduces the read role which allows users to access analyzer reports and read them but not execute analyzers. For that, users need the analyze role (which implies the read role). orgAdmin users can also run analyzers. superAdmin users are limited to the default cortex organization. While they can create organizations and manage users within them, they cannot access analyzer configurations such as confidential API keys or job reports.

Screen Shot 2018-03-29 at 16.31.28
Job reports

Report Persistence and Caching

Cortex 2 relies on Elasticsearch 5.x to store many configuration items but also all the analyzer reports that have been generated. Unlike its predecessor, you won’t lose your existing reports should you need to restart the service or the host it is running on.

Cortex 2 also introduces report caching. By default the cache.job parameter is set to 10 minutes in /etc/cortex/application.conf. That means that if an analysis on a given observable with a defined TLP is requested and that a report has been previously generated in the last 10 minutes, Cortex 2 will serve that report instead of running a new analysis. This feature can help prevent soliciting analyzers, particularly those which require a subscription or have quotas, when there is no need to do so. Please note that this parameter is global to all the analyzers and all the organizations that are configured in the Cortex 2 instance. We do have plans to make it more granular in future versions.

Migrating from Cortex 1

If you are migrating from Cortex 1.x, we recommend that you:

  1. Save the configuration of your analyzers (which ones are enabled and what their configuration items are, such as users/passwords or API keys).
  2. Install Cortex 2.
  3. Edit /etc/cortex/application.conf to add the secret key as shown in Step 1 of the Quick Start Guide and point Cortex to the location of the analyzers.
  4. Follow the remaining steps of the Quick Start Guide to enable the analyzers you need and reinject their configuration.

What’s Next?

In the upcoming weeks, we will release a new version of Cortex4py in order to make it compatible with Cortex 2, continue the work we started with our MISP Project friends to support MISP attribute enrichment through Cortex 2 (MISP currently only supports enrichment using Cortex 1), and perform a long-overdue overhaul of our documentation.

Feeling Generous? Donate!

As you know, we are a FOSS project and donations are always welcome to make our products even better for the community.

All donations go to Creative Source, the non-profit organization we have created, and we will use them to improve TheHive, Cortex & Hippocampe but also to develop (even better) integrations with other FOSS solutions such as MISP.

So if you are feeling generous, please contact us at support@thehive-project.org.

Creative Source can also provide so-called professional, entreprise-grade support, help integrating the products, train your analysts before they drain or assist you in specific areas such as developing in-house analyzers for Cortex.

Support

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? No worries, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

Correction: March 30, 2018
Instructions on how to update the cortex-analyzers have been added. Also, Cortex 2.0.1 was released to correct a few bugs in the previous version since this post went live.