Creative Source, a New Ally and a New Home

The Chefs who’ve been working hard to create delicious recipes in TheHive Project’s code kitchen are happy to announce the establishment of Creative Source, a non-profit organization, which aims to support TheHive, Cortex and Hippocampe.

Who’s behind this NPO?

Creative Source is co-managed by all the members of TheHive Project’s core team: Nabil Adouani, Thomas Franco, Danni Co, Saâd Kadhi and Jérôme Léonard. Work is in progress to provide Creative Source with a Web face.

What Will you Provide through It?

We have already started working with a couple of large organizations to provide trainings, limited support and assistance in Cortex analyzer development. All the money Creative Source is going to gain will serve to further support the project and keep refining our recipes to make them even more palatable.

If you are interested in funding the project, training your analysts or if you are looking for professional assistance with our products, please contact us at support@thehive-project.org.

Will TheHive, Cortex and Hippocampe Stay Free?

Don’t you dare ask that question! TheHive, Cortex and Hippocampe will stay free and open source in the foreseeable future as we are deeply committed in helping the global fight against cybercrime to the best of our abilities.

New Ally

We are also very happy to announce that Nils Kuhnert (a.k.a. @0x3c7 on Twitter), a longtime contributor, has now joined TheHive Project! We are no longer a pure French project, damn! 😉

Nils, who created many analyzers, will work mainly with Jérôme to deal with existing and new ones and absorb the numerous pull requests that have been piling up for many months. Welcome on board Nils!

New Home

IMG_4034
Author : Saâd Kadhi

To accommodate Nils and future members, our code and documentation will leave the lofty shelter of CERT-BDF‘s Github and move to https://github.com/orgs/TheHive-Project/  on Wed Dec 20, 2017. Save the date folks!

TheHive4py 1.4.0 Released

Version 1.4.0 of the Python API client for TheHive is now available. It is compatible with the freshly released Cerana (TheHive 3.0.0).

We’d like to thank Nick Pratley, a frequent contributor, Bill Murrin, Alexander Gödeke and “srilumpa” for their code additions and documentation.

To update your existing package:

$ sudo pip install thehive4py --upgrade

If you are just getting started with TheHive4py, you can forgo the --upgrade at the end of the command above.

New Features

  • #5: Add a method to update a case, contributed by Nick Pratley
  • #34: Add a get_task_logs method in order to obtain all the task logs associated with a given taskId. Contributed by Bill Murrin
  • #37: A new, very cool case helper class by Nick Pratley
  • #39: Add support for custom fields to the case model
  • #40: Ability to run a Cortex analyzer through the API by Alexander Gödeke
  • #45: Simplify case creation when using a template by providing just its name
  • #49: Add a query builder capability to support TheHive’s DSL query syntax

Paris? Are you There?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. As usual, we’ll be more than happy to help!

Featured

Introducing Cerana

Update: 2 days after publishing this blog post, we’ve released Cerana 0.1 (TheHive 3.0.1) which fixes a number of issues. We encourage you to use 3.0.1 instead of 3.0.0.

The friendly honeybees at TheHive’s code kitchen were pretty busy lately even though winter came and temperatures have been close to zero Celsius in Paris, France. As we wrote a couple of weeks ago on this very blog, we are happy to announce Cerana to the world, available immediately.

Cerana or TheHive 3.0.0 is the latest (and obviously greatest) release of a now highly popular open source, free Security Incident Response Platform (or SIRP for short). Its flagship feature in comparison to previous releases is Dynamic Dashboards.

Dynamic Dashboards

Dynamic Dashboards replace the Statistics module in Cerana to allow you to explore the data available in Elasticsearch, which TheHive uses for storage, in many ways. For example, you can have a usage breakdown of Cortex analyzers, the number of open cases per assignee, the number of alerts per source (MISP, email notifications, DigitalShadows, Zerofox, Splunk, …), the number of observables that have been flagged as IOCs in a given time period, how many attributes were imported from MISP instances, top 10 tags of imported MISP attributes or incident categories.

case3.png
Dynamic Dashboards

Dynamic Dashboards can be created by an analyst and kept private or shared with the other team members. Dashboards can also be exported and imported into another instance. This would facilitate community participation in the establishment of valuable data exploration graphs to drive DFIR activity and seek continuous improvement.

When you’ll migrate to Cerana, you won’t have to build dashboards from scratch. We recreated more or less those which were available under the Statistics view and included them in the Cerana build.

Cortex and MISP Health Status

Cerana will also allow you to monitor the health status of all the Cortex and MISP instances that it is connected to. In the bottom right corner of TheHive’s Web UI, the Cortex and MISP logos appear when you have configured the integration with those products as in previous releases. However, the logos will have a small outer circle which color will change depending on whether Cortex and/or MISP instances are reachable or not.

status
Cortex & MISP Health

If TheHive can’t reach N out of M Cortex/MISP instances, the outer circle will be orange. If it can’t reach all M instances, the circle will red. If everything is fine, the circle will be green. The exact status of each Cortex/MISP instance can be seen in the About page. And when you try to run analyzers on a Cortex which cannot be reached, TheHive will tell you so as well.

about
Cortex & MISP: Version & Status

Sighted IOCs

In previous releases of TheHive, observables can be flagged as IOCs. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean you’ve seen them in your network. Think for example of a suspicious attachment which you’ve submitted to Cuckoo or Joe Sandbox through Cortex. The analyzer returns some C2 addresses to which the sample tries to connect to. You’d be right to add those C2 addresses to your case and flag them as IOCs. Then you search for them in your proxy logs and you find connection attempts to one out of four. In previous versions, you’d add a seen label but this would be inconsistent among analysts. One may use found instead. Another will add a description and no labels.

To avoid such situations and give you a simple way to declare an IOC as seen, Cerana adds a sighted toggle which you can switch on/off. We will leverage this toggle in future versions to indicate sightings when sharing back cases to MISP.

Other Features and Improvements

Cerana contains numerous other features and improvements such as:

  • Case template import, export
  • The ability to assign default values to metrics and custom fields to case templates
  •  The ability to assign by default tasks to their rightful owners in case templates
  • Show already known observables when previewing MISP events in the Alerts page
  • Add autonomous systems to the list of default datatypes
  • Single-sign on using X.509 certificates (in BETA currently)

We will update the documentation for Cerana in the upcoming weeks. So stay tuned.

Download & Get Down to Work

If you have an existing installation of TheHive, please follow the migration guide.

If you are performing a fresh installation, read the installation guide corresponding to your needs and enjoy. Please note that you can install TheHive using an RPM or DEB package, use Docker, install it from a binary or build it from sources.

Support

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? No worries, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

Cortex Hits the 30 Analyzers Mark

Cortex has now 30 analyzers thanks to Daniil Yugoslavskiy, Davide Arcuri and Andrea Garavaglia (from LDO-CERT) as well as our longtime friend Sébastien Larinier. Their contributions, all under an AGPLv3 license, add handy ways to assess observables and obtain invaluable insight to an already solid Threat Intelligence and DFIR toolset.

In addition to these 3 new analyzers, v 1.7.0 of the Cortex-Analyzers repository also fixes a number of bugs and add a few improvements to existing analyzers as well.

To get the new release, go to your existing Cortex-Analyzers folder and run git pull.

HybridAnalysis

The HybridAnalysis analyzer has been contributed by Daniil Yugoslavskiy. It fetches Hybrid Analysis reports associated with hashes and filenames. This analyzer comes in only one flavor called HybridAnalysis_GetReport.

Requirements

You need to have or create a free Hybrid Analysis account.  Follow the instructions outlined on the Hybrid Analysis API page to generate an API key/secret pair. Provide the API key as a value for the key parameter and the secret as a value to the secret parameter, add the lines below to the config section of /etc/cortex/application.conf then restart the cortex service.

HybridAnalysis {
  secret = "mysecret"
  key = "myAPIKEY"
}

When run from TheHive, the analyzer produces short and long reports such as the following:

sc-short-hybridanalysis_1_0.png

TheHive: HybridAnalysis 1.0 Analyzer – Short and Long Report Samples
TheHive: HybridAnalysis 1.0 Analyzer – Short and Long Report Samples

EmergingThreats

The EmergingThreats analyzer has been submitted by Davide Arcuri and Andrea Garavaglia  from LDO-CERT. It leverages Proofpoint’s Emerging Threats Intelligence service to assess the reputation of various observables and obtain additional and valuable information on malware.

The service comes in three flavors:

  • EmergingThreats_DomainInfo: retrieve ET reputation, related malware, and IDS requests for a given domain.
  • EmergingThreats_IPInfo: retrieve ET reputation, related malware, and IDS requests for a given IP address.
  • EmergingThreats_MalwareInfo: retrieve ET details and info related to a malware hash.

Requirements

You need a valid Proofpoint ET Intelligence subscription.  Retrieve the API key associated with your account and provide it as a value to the key parameter, add the lines below to the config section of /etc/cortex/application.conf then restart the cortex service.

 EmergingThreats {
   key="MYETINTELKEYGOESHERE"
 }

When run from TheHive, it produces short and long reports such as the following:

sc-short-ET_1_0.png

sc-long-ET-1_1_0.png

sc-long-ET-2_1_0.png

sc-long-ET-3_1_0.png

sc-long-ET-4_1_0.png

sc-long-ET-5_1_0.png
TheHive: EmergingThreats 1.0 Analyzer – Short and Long Report Samples

Shodan

The Shodan analyzer is the first submission by Sébastien Larinier. It lets you retrieve key Shodan information on domains and IP addresses.

This analyzer comes in two flavors:

  • Shodan_Host: get Shodan information on a host.
  • Shodan_Search: get Shodan information on a domain.

Requirements

You need to create a Shodan account and retrieve the associated API Key. For
best results, it is advised to get a Membership level account, otherwise a free one can be used.

Supply the API key as the value for the key parameter, add the lines below to the config section of /etc/cortex/application.conf then restart the cortex service.

Shodan {
  key= "myawesomeapikey"
}

When run from TheHive, it produces short and long reports such as the following:

sc-short-shodan_1_0.png

sc-long-shodan_1_0.png
TheHive: Shodan 1.0 Analyzer – Short and Long Report Samples

Miscellaneous Fixes and Improvements

  • #100 : support both Cuckoo versions – by Garavaglia Andrea
  • #113 : Cuckoo Analyzer requires final slash – by Garavaglia Andrea
  • #93 : VirusTotal URL Scan Bug
  • #101 : Missing olefile in MsgParser requirements
  • #126 : PhishTank analyzer doesn’t work – by Ilya Glotov

Update TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, get the last version of  the report templates and import them into TheHive.

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

Cortex 1.1.4 Released

Moments ago, we have announced the release of Mellifera 13, TheHive4py 1.3.0, and Cortex4py. And since we don’t want to leave you wanting for more fun time, you may want to schedule as well a Cortex update shall you need it 😉

Implemented Enhancements

  • Disable analyzer in configuration file #32
  • Group ownership in Docker image prevents running on OpenShift #42

Fixed Bugs

  • Cortex removes the input details from failure reports #38
  • Display a error notification on analyzer start fail #39

Download & Get Down to Work

To update your current Cortex installation, follow the instructions of the installation guide. Before doing so, you may want to save the job reports that were not executed via TheHive. Cortex 1 has no persistence and restarting the service will wipe out any existing reports.

Please note that you can install Cortex using an RPM or DEB package, deploy it using an Ansible script, use Docker, install it from a binary or build it from sources.

Support

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? No worries, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

Introducing Cortex4py

Following popular demand, the chefs at TheHive Project‘s code kitchen are happy to announce the immediate availability of Cortex4py.

What Is It?

Cortex4py is a Python API client for Cortex, a powerful observable analysis engine where observables such as IP and email addresses, URLs, domain names, files or hashes can be analyzed one by one using a Web interface or en masse through the API.

Cortex4py allows analysts to automate these operations and submit observables in bulk mode through the Cortex REST API from alternative SIRP platforms (TheHive has native support for one or multiple Cortex instances) and custom scripts.

 

Use It

To install the client, use PIP:

$ sudo pip install cortex4py

 

How Much Does it Cost?

Cortex4py is released under an AGPL license as all the other products we publish to help the IR community fight the good fight. So apart from the effort it’ll cost you to install and use, the price of our software is nada, zero, rien. But if you are willing to contribute one way or another, do not hesitate to drop us an email at support@thehive-project.org or contact us via Twitter.

Support

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? No worries, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

WOT? Did You See a Yeti Hugging a Cuckoo?

While many are enjoying the summer holidays, the busy bees of TheHive Project have been working hard lately to develop new Cortex analyzers and review few of those submitted by our growing and thriving user community, bringing the grand total to 27. Yes, you read that right. Cortex can leverage 27 analyzers to help you analyze observables very simply in many different ways.

The latest update to the Cortex-analyzers repository contains 3 new analyzers: Yeti, Cuckoo Sandbox and WOT, described below. And your first step to benefit from them should consist of refreshing your master working copy on your Cortex instance:

$ cd where/your/analyzers/are
$ git pull master

Yeti

YETI is a FOSS platform meant to organize observables, indicators of compromise, TTPs, and knowledge on threats in a single, unified repository.  It is mainly developed by fellow APT busters Thomas Chopitea and Gael Muller (who said France doesn’t produce good software?).

The new Cortex analyzer for this platform lets you make API calls to YETI and retrieve all available information pertaining to a domain, a fully qualified domain name, an IP address, a URL or a hash.

To be able to use the analyzer edit the Cortex configuration file (/etc/cortex/application.conf) and add the following lines:

Yeti {
    # URL of the Yeti server: example: http://120.0.0.1:5000
    url = ""
}

When called from TheHive, the following output is produced:

sc-YETI-short.png

sc-YETI-long.png
TheHive: YETI analyzer — Short and Long Report Samples

CuckooSandox

The Cuckoo Sandbox analyzer has been submitted by Andrea Garavaglia (Thanks!) and you can use it to analyze files and URLs with Cuckoo Sandbox.

By default, we chose to limit analysis to TLP:WHITE and TLP:GREEN observables for OPSEC reasons, in case your Cuckoo server provides Internet access to potentially harmful files. If you want to use it with TLP:AMBER or TLP:RED observables, edit CuckooSanbox_File_analysis.json or CuckooSanbox_URL_analysis.json and change the max_tlp parameter to 2 or 3.

To use the analyzer, edit the Cortex configuration file and add the following lines:

CuckooSandbox {
   url = “http://mycuckoosandbox”
}

When called from TheHive, the following output is produced:

sc-CSB-short.png

sc-CSB-long.png
TheHive: Cuckoo Sandbox Analyzer — Short and Long Report Samples

WOT

The WOT analyzer was also submitted by Andrea Garavaglia (kudos!). Use it to check reputation of a given domain on the Web of Trust service. It takes domains and FQDNs as input.

An API key is needed to use this service, and has to be added in the Cortex configuration file:

WOT {
    # API key of the Web of Trust account
    key=“”
}

When called from TheHive, the following output is produced:

sc-WOT-short.png.png

sc-WOT-long.png.png
TheHive: WOT Analyzer — Short and Long Report Samples

Support

Something does not work as expected? No worries, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.