Hold your breath and git pull

Cortex-Analyzer 1.13.0 is out and includes new analyzers, some improvements and few bug fixes :

  • Hunter.io has been contributed by Rémi Allain (@remiallain)
  • DShield lookup contributed by Xavier Martens (@xme)
  • Pulsedive contributed by Nils Kuhnert (@3c7, TheHive Project)
  • FileInfo has been enhanced with Manalyze submodule for PE analysis ; by @lctrcl and Nils Kuhnert (@3c7)
  • Thanks to @silrumpa, the Fortiguard_URLCategory analyzer has been updated and let you configure categories and customize theirs maliciousness level
  • PhishingInitiative analyzer has been flavoured with a scan facility, thanks to Rémi Pointel

Huge thanks for the awesome work that has been performed by all our contributors!

Hunterio_DomainSearch

Hunter.io is a search engine that lets you find emails associated with a given domain name. The analyzer can be used to query the API and get a list of email addresses for a specific domain name. An API key is required to use this analyzer and can be obtained by registering on the website.

Results are displayed in TheHive in the following manner:

sc-hunterio-short

sc-hunterio-long
Hunterio_DomainSearch: short and long report samples

DShield_lookup

The analyzer lets you query the famous SANS Internet Storm Center (ISC) DShield API and look up IP address reputation. No API key is needed to run this analyzer.

Results are displayed in TheHive in the following manner:

sc-dshield-short
sc-dshield-long
DShield_lookup: short and long report templates

Pulsedive_GetIndicator

Pulsedive is a Threat Intelligence platform that allows you to enrich your observables. The analyzer can be used to query  the API and get information about a domain name,  hash, IP or URL. An API key is required to use this analyzer and can be acquired by creating an account on the webiste.

Results are displayed in TheHive in the following manner:

sc-pulsedive-short

sc-pulsedive-long
Pulsedive_GetIndicator: short and long report templates

Manalyze joins FileInfo

Manalyze is a tool developed by Ivan Kwiatkowski (@JusticeRage) that lets you analyze, operate PE (Portable Executable) and collect useful artifacts that help the analyst in determining its maliciousness.

@lctrcl wrote an analyzer that triggers Manalyze on a PE file and gives the analyst a useful report. Nils Kuhnert (@3c7) from TheHive Project then included this analyzer as a submodule into our FileInfo meta-analyzer for files ; it can run Manalyze from compiled binary, or, if your Cortex server is ready for that, through the right docker. If you decide to use the compiled binary, please follow instruction from Manalyze github page.

This submodule is disabled by default. To use it, you have to set some configuration in Cortex:

sc-fileinfo-config
FileInfo: configuration for Manalyze in Cortex

Results are displayed in TheHive in the following manner:

sc-fileinfo-short3

sc-fileinfo-long3
Manalyze submodule: short and long report templates

Fortiguard_URLCategory

This analyzer has been enhanced to let analysts choose categories considered as malicious or suspicious. It comes with a default configuration but you can setup your own by selecting the categories from the Fortiguard website.

sc-fortiguard-config
Fortiguard_URLCategory: default configuration for categories  in Cortex

Select which categories you want to be considered malicious or suspicious, and others will be considered by the analyzer as info. Analyzed observables that are not categorised by Fortigard service is considered as safe.

PhishingInitiative_Scan

PhishingInitiative has been enhanced with a new scan flavor. This let the analyst submit an URL to the webservice. An API key is needed to run this analyzer and can be obtained by registering on the website.

Results are displayed in TheHive in the following manner:

sc-phishinginitiative-short

sc-phishinginitiative-long
PhishingInitiative_Scan: short and long report samples

Bug fixes

  • #335 : fix a bug in MISP analyzer
  • #340 : fix short report template in C1fApp
  • #339 : fix short and mini reports for Domaintools Whois history flavor

Get It While Supply Lasts!

Each analyzer comes with its own, pip compatible requirements.txt file. To update your Cortex analyzers to 1.13.0, run the following commands:

cd path/to/Cortex-Analyzers
git pull
for I in analyzers//requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip2 install -r $I; done && \
for I in analyzers/
/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -r $I || true; done

Once done, do not forget to login to Cortex as an orgadmin and click on the Refresh Analyzers button. Refer to the online Cortex documentation for further details.

Update TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, get the latest version of  the report templates and import them into TheHive.

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

Correction: September 25, 2018
The link to the report templates was incorrect.

EmlParser: a New Cortex Analyzer for EML Files

The new EmlParser analyzer which we included in Cortex-Analyzers 1.12.0 leverages the eml_parser python library written by GOVCERT-LU. It parses EML email,  a MIME RFC 822 standard format, and extract all the information to help the analyst triage and investigate. EmlParser will prove very useful when analyzing observables imported from Synapse alerts.

You might notice that the analyzer’s requirements.txt installs the eml_parser library from one of our repositories. The original library dependencies contains file_magic library which brokes other analyzers that use python-magic. GOVCERT-LU is addressing this situation in their code but the installation process still considers file-magic as a mandatory library. We decided to consider it as an extra requirement.

Screen Shot 2018-07-26 at 08.19.11.png
Screen Shot 2018-07-26 at 08.19.31.png
EmlParser: short and long report samples

Get It While Supply Lasts!

To update your Cortex analyzers to 1.12.0, run the following commands:

cd path/to/Cortex-Analyzers

git pull

for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip2 install -r $I; done && \

for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -r $I || true; done

Once done, do not forget to login to Cortex as an orgadmin and click on the Refresh Analyzers button.

Update TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, get the latest version of  the report templates and import them into TheHive.

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

Keep Them Coming: Hashdd, URLhaus & a Revamped FileInfo analyzer

We are happy to announce the immediate availability of a new major version of Cortex-Analyzers. Version 1.11.0 includes two brand new analyzers, several updates and a few bug fixes:

  • Hashdd, contributed by  iosonogio
  • URLhaus, contributed by  ninoseki
  • The Domaintools analyzer has been updated with two new flavors: Risk and Reputation
  • The VirusTotal analyzer can (finally!) get reports for URL observables
  • MsgParser and File_Info have been merged in a new, shiny, completely rewritten FileInfo analyzer

As we are approaching the 90 analyzers mark, we wholeheartedly thank our user community for continuously contributing new analyzers, testing them and helping us improve the existing ones.

Important Notice

We made significant changes in this release in the analyzers and short reports. Prior to Cortex-Analyzers 1.11.0, the summary() function in the analyzer code generates a result such as:

"taxonomies": [{
     "level": "suspicious",
     "namespace": "DT",
     "predicate": "Risk",
     "value": "\"10\""
 }]

Double quotes were included in the resulting value. We decided to update the summary() function and make it generate the same result without double quotes :

"taxonomies": [{
     "level": "suspicious",
     "namespace": "DT",
     "predicate": "Risk",
     "value": "10"
 }]

To display the double quotes in TheHive, we updated all short reports to include them:

<span class="label" ng-repeat="t in content.taxonomies" ng-class="{'info': 'label-info', 'safe': 'label-success', 'suspicious': 'label-warning', 'malicious':'label-danger'}[t.level]">
     {{t.namespace}}:{{t.predicate}}="{{t.value}}"
</span>

Hashdd

hashdd.com is a search engine for file hashes which automatically queries 3rd party services like VirusTotal and enriches the information provided based on the 3rd party data. The analyzer includes two flavors: Status and Detail. The first one is used to query hashdd without an API key for the threat level only. The latter produces additional meta information about the sample, but requires an API key.

Results are displayed in TheHive in the following manner:

Hashdd short report

Hashdd status long report

Hashdd detail long report
hashdd — short and long report samples

URLhaus

URLhaus, a service that shares the latest malware download URLs and reports those sites to their respective hosting companies, can now be queried for domains, URLs and hashes. If the observable is found, available information will be displayed as follows:

URLhaus short report

URLhaus long report
URLhaus – short and long report samples

Domaintools Risk and Reputation

New Risk and Reputation services from Domaintools have been added as new flavors to the existing Domaintools analyzer set.

Risk Evidence

The DomainTools Risk Score predicts the risk level and likely threats from a domain that has not been observed in malicious activities, by analyzing various properties of the domain as soon as it is registered.

sc-DTrisk-short

sc-DTrisk-long
Domaintools Risk Evidence – short and long report

Reputation

The Domaintools Reputation Score gives indications about how closely a domain is related to known bad domains, actors, and IPs.

sc-DTReputation-short

sc-DTReputation-long
Domaintools Reputation – short and long report samples

An All New FileInfo

FileInfo performs local static analysis of file observables. It has been completely rewritten from the ground up to be more flexible thus it can easily be enriched with new supported file types and analysis modules. We took this opportunity to merge MsgParser, in charge of extracting and displaying Outlook emails into FileInfo.

As of this release, FileInfo now supports PDF, PE, MS Office documents and Outlook .msg files. We also added support for DDE detection and link extraction in MS Office documents, thanks to Decalage who added this in Oletools since v0.52.

sc-FileInfo-short

sc-FileInfo-long2
FileInfo – short and long report samples

Bug fixes

  • #286 : we updated the way MISP analyzer validates its SSL configuration

  • #292 : we fixed the API URL of malwares.com in the Malwares analyzer

Get It While Supply Lasts!

Each analyzer comes with its own, pip compatible requirements.txt file. To update your Cortex analyzers to 1.11.0, run the following commands:

cd path/to/Cortex-Analyzers
git pull
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip2 install -r $I; done && \
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -r $I || true; done

Once done, do not forget to login to Cortex as an orgadmin and click on the Refresh Analyzers button.

Update TheHive Report Templates

If you are using TheHive, get the latest version of  the report templates and import them into TheHive.

Running Into Trouble?

Shall you encounter any difficulty, please join our  user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We will be more than happy to help!

Cortex-Analyzers 1.10.2

On June 6, 2018, we released Cortex-Analyzers 1.10, which contained 11 new analyzers, bringing the total to 83 programs. You read that correctly: 83 ways to assess and gain insight on observables collected during the course of an investigation or while performing threat intelligence thanks to Cortex, our free & open source analysis engine. One day after, we published version 1.10.1 which fixed the name of the Anomali STAXX reports for TheHive. Since then we uncovered a few additional issues which version 1.10.2 corrects:

  • #273 & #283: two encoding issues in the ThreatCrowd JSON definition file
  • #275: the GreyNoise mini-report for TheHive did not produce any information when no record was found
  • #278: the IBM X-Force analyzer forced the TLP in its configuration
  • #279: the VMRay should authorize self-signed certificates
  • #280: the name of the IBM X-Force Exchange report folder was incorrect preventing TheHive from displaying mini-reports or usefully laid out long ones

To install this hotfix release on your Cortex instance:

$ cd /path/to/Cortex-Analyzers
$ sudo git pull

Then log in to the Cortex Web UI as an orgAdmin and click on Refresh Analyzers:

click

If you are using TheHive, make sure to download the latest version of the report templates and import them into your instance.

Support

Something does not work as expected? No worries, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

There are More than 80 Ways to Analyze Them

TheHive Project Chefs are pleased to announce the immediate availability of Cortex-Analyzers 1.10.1. To install this new release and benefit from 11 new analyzers and some fixes:

$ cd /path/to/Cortex-Analyzers
$ sudo git pull
$ for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip2 install -r $I; done && \
for I in analyzers/*/requirements.txt; do sudo -H pip3 install -r $I || true; done

After running these commands, read the Analyzer Requirements Guide,  log into the Cortex 2 Web UI as an orgAdmin, click on the Refresh Analyzers button in the Cortex Web UI, configure the new analyzers and enjoy!

click.png
Cortex: click on Refresh Analyzers after updating to the latest Cortex-analyzers version

If you are using TheHive, get the last version of  the report templates and import them into TheHive.

New Analyzers

We have added 11 analyzers to this release, bringing the total to 53 (83 if we count all the flavors):

  1. Crtsh: contributed by crackytsi
  2. Cybercrime-Tracker: contributed by ph34tur3
  3. FireEye iSIGHT: contributed by Davide Arcuri and Andrea Garavaglia from LDO-CERT
  4. GreyNoise: contributed by Nclose
  5. IBM X-Force: contributed by Davide Arcuri and Andrea Garavaglia from LDO-CERT
  6. Malwares: contributed by Davide Arcuri and Andrea Garavaglia from LDO-CERT
  7. MnemonicPDNS: contributed by Michael Stensrud from the Nordic Financial CERT
  8. StaxxSearch: contributed by Robert Nixon
  9. StopForumSpam: contributed by Marc-André Doll from STARC (by EXAPROBE)
  10. ThreatCrowd: contributed by Rémi Allain from Cyberprotect
  11. Unshortenlink: contributed by Rémi Pointel from CERT-BDF

Crtsh

Get Crt.sh certificate transparency lists associated with a domain name. Crt.sh is an online service operated by the Comodo Certificate Authority.

The analyzer comes in only one flavor. No configuration is required. It can be used out of the box.

Screen Shot 2018-06-05 at 16.46.22.png

Screen Shot 2018-06-05 at 16.46.31.png
TheHive: Crtsh — Short and Long Report Samples

Cybercrime-Tracker

Use the Cybercrime-tracker.net service to assess whether an IP address, URL, domain, or FQDN has a C2 (Command & Control) entry in its database.

This analyzer comes in only one flavor. No configuration is required. It can be used out of the box.

Screenshot from 2018-06-05 14-43-54.png

Screenshot from 2018-06-05 14-43-37.png
TheHive: CyberCrime-Tracker — Short and Long Report Samples

FireEye iSIGHT

Leverage FireEye iSIGHT Threat Intelligence to qualify domains, IP addresses, hashes and URLs.

This analyzer comes in only one flavor. You need a valid FireEye iSIGHT Threat Intelligence subscription to use the analyzer. Retrieve the API key associated with your account and provide it as a value to the key parameter. Obtain the password associated with the API key and provide it as a value to the pwd parameter.

Fireeye.png
TheHive: FireEye iSIGHT — Long Report Sample (courtesy of Andrea Garavaglia)

GreyNoise

Determine whether an IP has known scanning activity using GreyNoise.

This analyzer comes in only one flavor. It can be used out of the box without configuration. However, if you make many requests, you need to obtain an API key. Please contact GreyNoise to ask for one. Once you get the API key, provide it as the value of the key parameter.

Screenshot from 2018-06-05 14-48-02.png

Screenshot from 2018-06-05 14-47-42.png
TheHive: GreyNoise — Short and Long Report Samples

IBM X-Force

Query domains, IPs, hashes and URLs against IBM X-Force Threat Intelligence sharing platform.

This analyzer comes in only one flavor. Access to IBM X-Force Threat Exchange requires an IBM ID. Once you have access to the service, supply the URL of the service as value for the url parameter, the API key associated with your account as value for the key parameter and the associated password as the value of the pwd parameter.

IBM-XForce.PNG
TheHive: IBM X-Force — Long Report Sample (courtesy of Andrea Garavaglia)

Malwares

Query Malwares.com and get reports on files, hashes, domain names and IP addresses.

The analyzer comes in two flavors:
– Malwares_pDNS_GetReport: get the latest Malwares report for a file,
hash, domain or an IP address.
– Malwares_pDNS_Scan: scan a file or URL.

You need to sign up for a Malwares.com account. An API key to use the service’s API should be associated with your account. Supply it as the value of the key parameter.

Screen Shot 2018-06-05 at 16.56.38.png

Screen Shot 2018-06-05 at 16.56.57.png
TheHive: Malwares_GetReport — Short and Long Report Samples

MnemonicPDNS

Query IP addresses and domain names against Mnemonic Passive DNS service.

This analyzer comes in two flavors:

  • Mnemonic_pDNS_Public: query Mnemonic’s public service.
  • Mnemonic_pDNS_Closed: query Mnemonic’s closed service.

When using the public service, the analyzer can be used out of the box with no further configuration. When using the closed service, you need to contact Mnemonic to get an API key which you’ll need to supply as the value of the key parameter.

Screenshot from 2018-06-05 14-46-40.png

Screenshot from 2018-06-05 14-46-19.png
TheHive: Mnemonic PDNS — Short and Long Report Samples

StaxxSearch

Fetch observable details from an Anomali STAXX instance.

This analyzer comes in only one flavor. You need to install an Anomali STAXX instance or to have access to one to use the analyzer. Supply the following parameters to the analyzer in order to use it:

  • auth_url: URL of the authentication endpoint.
  • query_url: URL of the intelligence endpoint.
  • username: the STAXX user name.
  • password: the STAXX password.
  • cert_check: boolean indicating whether the certificate of the endpoint must be checked or not.
  • cert_path: path to the CA on the system to validate the endpoint’s certificate if cert_check is true.

image0010.png

image002.png
TheHive: StaxxSearch — Short and Long Report Samples (courtesy of Robert Nixon)

StopForumSpam

Query StopForumSpam to check if an IP or email address is a known spammer.

You need to define the thresholds above which the analyzed observable should be marked as suspicious or malicious.

Screen Shot 2018-06-05 at 18.32.08.png

Screen Shot 2018-06-05 at 18.32.21.png
TheHive: StopForumSpam — Short and Long Report Samples

ThreatCrowd

Look up domains, mail and IP addresses on [ThreatCrowd(https://www.threatcrowd.org/), a service powered by AlienVault.

This analyzer comes in only one flavor. No configuration is needed. It can be used out of the box.

Screenshot from 2018-06-05 14-45-29.png

Screenshot from 2018-06-05 14-45-11.png
TheHive: Threatcrowd — Short and Long Report Samples

Unshortenlink

Follow redirects of shortened URLs to reveal the real ones.

This analyzer comes in only one flavor.

No configuration is required. It can be used out of the box.

Warning: using this analyzer without extra caution might lead to unexpected consequences. For example, if the URL you are seeking to unshorten is an attacker-controlled one, you may end up leaving undesired traces in the threat actor’s infrastructure logs. The TLP values Cortex allows you to configure to prevent the use of an analyzer if the TLP associated with an observable is above the authorized level won’t be of much help since Unshortenlink have to access the shortened URL. Please do not activate this analyzer unless you (and your fellow analysts) know what they are doing.

Pasted image at 2018_06_05 09_07 PM.png

Screen Shot 2018-06-05 at 21.05.45.png
TheHive: Unshortenlink — Short and Long Report Samples

Additional Enhancements

  • YARA analyzer had a bug which was fixed in version 1.9.7 of the Cortex-analyzers repository. If you install 1.10, you’ll obviously benefit from the fix 😉
  • A permission problem that prevented using the Cuckoo Sandbox analyzer was corrected (thanks Felix Bauer!)

Support

Something does not work as expected? No worries, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

CorrectionJune 6, 2018
An earlier version of this post mentioned that GreyNoise needs an API key. That’s only necessary if a certain level of requests are made. Also, to configure analyzers, you need to be orgAdmin.

Cortex 2.0.3 Released and Analyzer Updates

There’s a new version of your ultimate observable analysis engine in town : Cortex 2.0.3 is out!

Cortex 2.0.3 contains a few important enhancements over its predecessor and fixes a number bugs as described in the full changelog summarised below. So get it while it’s still hot out of the digital oven and let us know how tasty it is.

analyzeallthethings
Source : Quickmeme.com

Implemented Enhancements

  • #81: reflect proxy changes in the global configuration at the analyzer level
  • #82: display invalid analyzers and let orgadmins delete them
  • #85: allow orgadmins to override the default global report cache.job period per analyzer through the Web UI
  • #86: allow a job to run with arbitrary parameters

Fixed Bugs

  • #75: a version upgrade of an analyzer makes all analyzers invisible in TheHive
  • #80: fix the analyzer configuration dialog to allow orgadmins to override the auto artifact extraction at the analyzer level
  • #83: hit Nabil on the head pretty hard until the analyzer refresh UI button works (well now it does so you can stop hitting poor Nabil’s head).

Analyzer Updates

We took the opportunity of a new release to make a few updates to the public analyzers. Cortex-Analyzers 1.9.3 contains the following changes:

  • Remove the Bluecoat analyzer to comply with the new ‘no scrapping’ ToS imposed by Symantec
  • Fix the default configuration of the Cymon Check IP analyzer
  • Fix the View all VT long template
  • Make the MISP Warning Lists Analyzer ignore case sensitivity when searching for hashes
  • Restrict the Abuse Finder and FileInfo analyzer dependencies to Python 2.7

You can read the full changelog if you like but if you want to enjoy the goods right away, git pull is your friend.

Support

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? Spotted new bugs? No worries, please open issues on GitHub or comment on existing ones, join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

 

Unveiling Cortex 2

TheHive Project’s Master Chefs are extremely happy to share, for free their latest recipe with the Cyber Threat Intelligence, Digital Forensics and Incident Response communities: Cortex 2.

As its predecessor, Cortex 2 is published under an AGPL v3 license and it introduces many important features that we brushed upon in a Dec 2017 post.

Screen Shot 2017-12-15 at 17.16.06
Cortex 2 — Architecture

Update: Cortex 2.0.1 was released since this post went live. It corrects a few bugs we uncovered in 2.0.0 as described in the changelog. Please install Cortex 2.0.1 instead of 2.0.0.

Authentication

Cortex 2 supports all the authentication methods that TheHive supports: LDAP, Active Directory, local accounts, API Keys, and X.509 SSO.

To connect your favorite Security Incident Response Platform with Cortex 2, you will need to update TheHive to Cerana 0.7 (TheHive 3.0.7) which was released today as well. This version fixes a regression pertaining to case templates introduced by Cerana 0.6 and is the first version to fully support Cortex 2’s API changes and authentication.

To make TheHive 3.0.7 analyze observables at scale through Cortex 2, you have to create an account on Cortex 2 with the read and analyze roles (see the next section) and generate the associated API Key. Next, feed the key in TheHive’s /etc/thehive/application.conf as described in the documentation et voilà !

TheHive 3.0.7 remains compatible with Cortex 1 and you can connect it to a mixed set of Cortex 1 and/or Cortex 2 instances with no issues.

Organizations, Analyzers and Rate Limiting

Cortex 2 introduces multi-tenancy through organizations and each organization can have its own set of users, with different roles, its own set of analyzers and, if necessary, rate limits that will prevent analysts from burning quotas.

Multi-tenancy has several interesting use cases. For instance, if you are the CSIRT or CERT of a large multinational organization with several regional teams, you can create an organization for each region within your constituency and enable the analyzers that they may need to use. Let’s assume that you bought a VirusTotal subscription that limits you to 5000 requests per month. You can configure the corresponding analyzers to give each region a fair share of that quota and keeping some requests for your own use.

In case you are a commercial CSIRT or an MSSP, you could do the same for your customers by installing only one Cortex 2 instance and creating an organization for each customer.

Screen Shot 2018-03-29 at 16.27.05.png
Configure an analyzer graphically and impose rate limits if necessary

User Roles

By default, Cortex 2 is shipped with the default cortex organization which sole purpose is to create other ones and manage the users within each organization and their associated powers. The cortex organization hosts all users with the superAdmin role and it cannot be used to configure or run analyzers.

As described in the new Quick Start Guide, after installing Cortex 2, updating its database and creating the first user who will have super admin powers, you’ll have to create your first organization and at least one user within that organization with orgAdmin rights.

Screen Shot 2018-03-29 at 16.33.02
Create an organization

You can then log out and log in using the orgAdmin account to create further users within that organization, enable and configure analyzers etc. Please note that no analyzer is enabled by default and you need at least v 1.9.0 of the cortex-analyzers repository. To update your set of analyzers to 1.9.0, please run git pull.

Screen Shot 2018-03-29 at 16.28.47
Manage users within an organization

Besides the superAdmin and orgAdmin roles, Cortex 2 introduces the read role which allows users to access analyzer reports and read them but not execute analyzers. For that, users need the analyze role (which implies the read role). orgAdmin users can also run analyzers. superAdmin users are limited to the default cortex organization. While they can create organizations and manage users within them, they cannot access analyzer configurations such as confidential API keys or job reports.

Screen Shot 2018-03-29 at 16.31.28
Job reports

Report Persistence and Caching

Cortex 2 relies on Elasticsearch 5.x to store many configuration items but also all the analyzer reports that have been generated. Unlike its predecessor, you won’t lose your existing reports should you need to restart the service or the host it is running on.

Cortex 2 also introduces report caching. By default the cache.job parameter is set to 10 minutes in /etc/cortex/application.conf. That means that if an analysis on a given observable with a defined TLP is requested and that a report has been previously generated in the last 10 minutes, Cortex 2 will serve that report instead of running a new analysis. This feature can help prevent soliciting analyzers, particularly those which require a subscription or have quotas, when there is no need to do so. Please note that this parameter is global to all the analyzers and all the organizations that are configured in the Cortex 2 instance. We do have plans to make it more granular in future versions.

Migrating from Cortex 1

If you are migrating from Cortex 1.x, we recommend that you:

  1. Save the configuration of your analyzers (which ones are enabled and what their configuration items are, such as users/passwords or API keys).
  2. Install Cortex 2.
  3. Edit /etc/cortex/application.conf to add the secret key as shown in Step 1 of the Quick Start Guide and point Cortex to the location of the analyzers.
  4. Follow the remaining steps of the Quick Start Guide to enable the analyzers you need and reinject their configuration.

What’s Next?

In the upcoming weeks, we will release a new version of Cortex4py in order to make it compatible with Cortex 2, continue the work we started with our MISP Project friends to support MISP attribute enrichment through Cortex 2 (MISP currently only supports enrichment using Cortex 1), and perform a long-overdue overhaul of our documentation.

Feeling Generous? Donate!

As you know, we are a FOSS project and donations are always welcome to make our products even better for the community.

All donations go to Creative Source, the non-profit organization we have created, and we will use them to improve TheHive, Cortex & Hippocampe but also to develop (even better) integrations with other FOSS solutions such as MISP.

So if you are feeling generous, please contact us at support@thehive-project.org.

Creative Source can also provide so-called professional, entreprise-grade support, help integrating the products, train your analysts before they drain or assist you in specific areas such as developing in-house analyzers for Cortex.

Support

Something does not work as expected? You have troubles installing or upgrading? No worries, please join our user forum, contact us on Gitter, or send us an email at support@thehive-project.org. We are here to help.

Correction: March 30, 2018
Instructions on how to update the cortex-analyzers have been added. Also, Cortex 2.0.1 was released to correct a few bugs in the previous version since this post went live.